Stephen F. Austin State University

Department of Human Services

Area of Study & Degrees

Accreditations

Faculty

Objectives

Objectives of the department include:

  1. the preparation of special education teachers for elementary and secondary schools,
  2. the preparation of people for careers in rehabilitation, orientation and mobility and related human services occupations serving people with disabilities, communication sciences and disorders, and
  3. graduate study in counseling, special education, communication sciences and disorders, and school psychology.

Rehabilitation Services

Rehabilitation personnel assist people with disabilities in achieving their greatest physical, mental, social, educational and vocational potential. Major requirements are as follows:

  1. University Core Curriculum Requirements (42-48 hours)

    1. Communication (12-14 hours)
      1. English Rhetoric/Composition (6 hours)
        1. Six hours from: ENG 131, 132, 133H
      2. Communication (6-8 hours)
        1. Six to eight hours from: BCM 247; COM 111, 170; FRE 131, 132; ILA 111, 112; ENG 273; SPA 131, 132; SPH 172, 272 (Business Communication, Technical Writing, Communication, Modern Language)
    2. Mathematics (3-5 hours)
      1. Three to five hours from: MTH 110, 133, 138, 143, 220, 233
    3. Natural Sciences (6-8 hours) (Lab Required)
      1. Eight hours from: BIO 121, 123, 131, 133, 225, 238; CHE 111, 112, 133, 134, 231; GOL 131, 132; PHY 101, 102, 110, 118, 131, 132; AST 105
    4. Humanities & Visual & Performing Arts (6 hours)
      1. Three hours from: ART 280, 281, 282; MUS 140; MHL 245; THR 161, 370; DAN 140, 341
      2. Three hours from: ENG 200 - 233H, 300; PHI 153, 223; HIS 151, 152
    5. Social & Behavioral Sciences (15 hours)
      1. Six hours from: HIS 133, 134
      2. Six hours from: PSC 141, 142
      3. Three hours from: ANT 231; ECO 231, 232; GEO 131, 230; PSY 133, 153; SOC 137, 139
  2. Institutionally Designated Options (6 hours)
    1. Three hours from: HMS 138; MSC 101, 102; MUS 136;
      1. Physical Activity (Computer Literacy or Health and Physical Activity)
    2. Three hours from: CSC 101 or equivalent
  3. Rehabilitation Services Core (15 hours)
    1. Fifteen hours from: RHB 220, 381, 383, 405, and EPS 485
  4. Major Requirements (33 hours)
    1. Thirty-three hours from: RHB 222, 224, 325, 385 (six hours), 407, 490, 494, plus nine semester hours from: SPE 329, 341; RHB 340, 422, 493, 495, 496; SPH 172, 272, 350, 414
  5. Other Requirements (18-24 hours).
    1. An academic minor of at least 18 semester hours and not more than 24 semester hours of which at least six semester hours must be advanced.
  6. Additional hours to make a total of at least 120 semester hours of acceptable credit.

Rehabilitation Services Moinor

Minor: RHB 220 and 15 to 21 hours planned with the minor adviser. The minor must include six semester hours advanced residence credit.

Addictions Studies Minor

This 21-hour minor lays the foundation for students wishing to attain further course work to obtain the Licensed Chemical and Drug Abuse (LCDA) Credential. Minor consists of the following courses: RHB 220, 222, 381, 422, 385 (six hours) and HSC 351.

Orientation & Mobility

The orientation and mobility specialist provides children and adults with visual impairments those skills and services that will enable the individual to move independently in familiar and unfamiliar environments.

Degree requirements are as follows:

  1. University Core Curriculum Requirements listed above under Rehabilitation Services.
  2. Fifteen hours from: Rehabilitation Services Core: RHB 220, 381, 383, 405, and EPS 485.
  3. Major Requirements: RHB 325, 340, 400 (six hours), 401, 402,493, 495, 496; SPE 442, 445.
  4. Other Requirements: An academic minor of at least 18 semester hours and not more than 24 semester hours of which at least six semester hours must be advanced.
  5. Additional hours to make a total of 120 semester hours of acceptable credit.

Core Requirements for All Level Special Education (120 hours)

  1. Core Curriculum (47 - 48 hours)
    1. Communication (12 hours)
      1. Six hours from: ENG 131, 132, 133, 134
      2. Six hours from: BCM 247, COM 111, 170; FRE 131, 132; ILA 111, 112; ENG 273; SPA 131, 132; SPH 172, 272
    2. Mathematics (3 hours)
      1. Three hours from: MTH 127 (more hours are required in another area)
    3. Natural Sciences (6-8 hours) (Labs Required)
      1. Eight hours from: CHE/ PHY 125 and GOL 131 or BIO 121
    4. Humanities & Visual & Performing Arts (6 hours)
      1. Three hours from: ART 280; THR 161, 370; DAN 140, 341
      2. Three hours from: ENG 200, 211, 212, 221, 222, 300
    5. Social Behavioral Sciences (15 hours)
      1. Six hours from: HIS 133, 134
      2. Six hours from: PSC 141, 142
      3. Three hours from: ECO 231, 232, PSY 133, 153, SOC 137, 139, ANT 231, GEO 131, 230
    6. Institutionally Designated Options (3 hours)
      1. One hour from: HMS 138
      2. Two hours from: KIN Physical activity
  2. Major Requirements for All Level Special Education
    Students are certified to teach Grades Pre-K through 12th Grade Special Education
    1. Core Curriculum as seen in 1. (47-48 hours)
    2. Academic Studies Major (50 hours)
      1. Twenty-eight hours from: SPE 432, 434, 438, 439, 461, 464, 460, 465; HMS 236 (four hours)
      2. Six hours from: RDG 318, 320
      3. Ten hours from: MTH 128, 129; & PHY 410; GOL 406; CHE 302 or BIO 474
    3. Pre-professional Teacher Education: SPE 329; EPS 380; ELE 304 (nine hours)
    4. Professional Teacher Education: SED 370, 372; SED 450, 450L, 443, SPE 443 (12 hours)or 443 (six hours)
    5. One hour of Electives

Minor in Special Education

A minor in Special Education is available to students with a major leading to teacher certification at the EC-4, 4-8, or 8-12 levels. Required courses include: SPE 329, 432, 434, 438, 439 and 461 (TExES 163 required). The minor available for students seeking all-level certification includes SPE 329, 432, 434, 438, 439, RDG 318, 320, and ELE 461 (two hours) (TExES 161 required). Admission to the Educator Certification Program is required and students must work with a special education adviser for course sequence and additional requirements.

Non-Teaching Minor

An 18-hour minor is available for those seeking additional training in working with special populations, but who are not seeking teacher certification. This minor is appropriate for students in programs such as psychology, orientation & mobility, kinesiology, rehabilitation, social work, and those seeking the Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences (BAAS) degree. Required courses are SPE 120, 329, 432, 460, 463 and 464.

Minor in Early Intervention

An 18-hour minor has been developed for students majoring in rehabilitation, speech-language pathology, psychology or other related fields who are interested in becoming an Early Intervention Specialist (EIS) working with infants and toddlers with special needs and their families. Required courses are: SPE 329, 464, 463; HMS 236, 443, 459. For students majoring in Human Sciences, the minor includes: SPE 329, 439, 434, 463, 464, 465.

Visually Impaired

The teacher of students with visual impairments (TVIs) program prepares the student to teach children with visual impairments as well as visual and multiple impairments ages 0 through 22. Students adding this certification may be eligible for stipends up to $12,000.

In order to complete the supplemental certificate in VI, the student will complete all of the curricular requirements for their selected program from above and the following disability specific classes: RHB 340, RHB 341, RHB 325, SPE 441, SPE 442 and SPE 445.

Completion of the TVI program and satisfactory completion of the state-mandated certification exams will certify students in their selected core area and in visual impairments.

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Program

The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Program prepares the student to teach children who are deaf and hard of hearing from pre-kindergarten through grade 12.

  1. Core Curriculum courses (42-44 hours)
    1. Communication (12 hours)
      1. Six hours from: ENG 131, 132, 133H
      2. Six hours from: SPH 172, 272
    2. Mathematics (3 hours)
      1. Three hours from: MTH 127 (More math hours required in other areas)
    3. Natural Sciences (6-8 hours)
      1. Six to eight hours from: AST 105; BIO 121, 123, 131, 133, 225, 238; CHE 111, 112, 133, 134; ENV 110; GOL 131, 132; PHY 101, 102, 110, 118, 131, 132, 241, 242
    4. Humanities & Visual & Performing Arts (6 hours)
      1. Three hours from: ART 280, 281, 282; MUS 140, 160; THR 161, 370; DAN 140, 341
      2. Three hours from: ENG 200-233H, 300; PHI 153, 223; HIS 151, 152
    5. Social & Behavioral Sciences (15 hours)
      1. Six hours from: US History (w/Texas option) HIS 133, 134, 335
      2. Six hours from: PSC 141, 142
      3. Three hours from: EPS 380
  2. Support/Pre-Major (33 hours)
    1. Fifteen hours of specialization: Choose 15 hours, with 12 of those 15 hours being upper level courses from special, history, math, science or English
    2. Twelve hours from: RDG 318, 320, SPE 329, SED 370
    3. Six hours from: MTH 128, MTH Additional math approved by adviser
  3. Major (30 hours)
    1. Thirty hours from: SPH 274, 414, 470, 471, 350, 476, 477, 478, 479, 442 Deaf or hard of hearing students who qualify for DARS services may be exempt from SPH 478, but must replace it with another specialization course. Any student exempted from 478 must still pass the Mock Interview covered in that class in order to get clearance for the TASC test.
  4. Professional (15 hours)
    1. Six hours from: SED 450, 450L and 372
    2. Nine hours from: SED 442, 443; ELE 441
  5. Documented Observation in Deaf Education classrooms (25 hours)
    1. Ten hours at the secondary level, ten hours at the elementary level and five hours at any level. Observation hours must be completed before any fieldwork will be permitted. Fieldwork includes internship, practicum and student teaching.
  6. A grade of at least a C in each Freshman English Basic Skills Test
    1. Before being admitted into teacher education, all candidates must pass the Basic Skills Test during RDG 318.
  7. TASC Test
    1. All teacher candidates must pass the Texas Assessment of Sign Communication (TASC) before student teaching. Clearance for the TASC requires passing a mock interview.
  8. TExES 181 certification test
    1. All teacher candidates must pass the TExES 181 test (Deaf and Hard of Hearing) test unless a formal waiver is granted. Clearance is granted only upon scoring 80% or better on a comprehensive test administered during the capstone course (SPH 422).
  9. PPR Certification test
    1. All Teacher candidates must pass the TExES Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities (PPR) test.

Educational Interpreting Minor

An educational interpreting minor can be acquired by taking the following courses: SPH 172, 272, 274, 350, 414, 477, 478, 479, 483, and 45 hours of observation in interpreting environments with qualified interpreters.

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Minor

A Deaf and Hard of Hearing Minor can be acquired by taking the following courses:

SPH 477, 479, 274, 350, 414, and one course from 470, 476 or 471 or 25 hours of observation in deaf education settings may be substituted for one course as an Independent Study (EPS 475). Observation hours must be divided as follows: ten hours at the elementary level, ten hours at the secondary level, and five hours at any level. Observation hours must be appropriately documented using an observation log provided by the Deaf and Hard of Hearing program.

Communication Disorders

The speech language pathologist evaluates and provides remedial instruction for children and adults who have speech, language or hearing problems. The bachelor's degree is a pre-professional degree for people wishing to pursue graduate study in communication sciences and disorders. The master's degree is required for Texas licensure and clinical certification by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

Admission Requirements

Students requesting admission to the Bachelor of Science degree program in Communication Sciences and Disorders must meet the following criteria:

  1. Acceptance to SFA
  2. Overall GPA of 2.5 in college work
  3. Completion of at least five of the following seven core courses with GPA of at least 3.0: SPH 130, 210, 230, 233, 250, 371, 480
    Students will not be permitted to register for advanced communication sciences and disorders courses unless they have completed the core courses and have been admitted to the Bachelor of Science degree program in communication sciences and disorders.

Admission Process

Admission is based upon the applicant's overall and core-course grade point averages. To be considered for admission review, the applicant must submit the following materials:

  1. Completed application to the Communication Sciences and Disorders Program
  2. Complete transcripts for all previous college credit
    Applications for admission to the summer and fall classes must be submitted by March 15 each year. Applications for admission to the spring classes must be submitted by Oct. 15 each year. It is the responsibility of the student to make sure that all application materials are received by the Communication Sciences and Disorders program by the deadline.

Required Courses (120 hours)

  1. Core Curriculum Requirements (44-48 hours)
    1. Communication (12-14 hours)
      1. Six hours from: ENG 131, 132, 133H
      2. Six to eight hours from: COM 111 and ENG 273
    2. Mathematics (3-5 hours)
      1. Three to five hours from: MTH 110, 133, 138, 139, 140, 220
    3. Biological Sciences (4 hours) (Lab Required)
      1. Four hours from: BIO 121, 123, 133, 238
    4. Physical Sciences (4 hours) (Lab Required)
      1. Four hours from: CHE 111, 112, 133, 134, 231; PHY 101, 102, 110, 118, 125, 131, 132
    5. Humanities & Visual & Performing Arts (6 hours)
      1. Three hours from: ART 280, 281, 282; MUS 140; MHL 245; THR 161, 370; DAN 341
      2. Three hours from: ENG 200 - 233H, 300; PHI 153, 223; HIS 151, 152
    6. Social & Behavioral Sciences (15 hours)
      1. Six hours from: HIS 133, 134
      2. Six hours from: HIS 133, 134
      3. Three hours from: PSY 133
  2. Institutionally Designated Options
    1. Three hours from: CSC 101
    2. Three hours from: ENG 344, 441
  3. An academic major of at least 48 semester credit hours for Speech-Language Pathology to include:
    1. SPE 329; SPH 130, 210, 230, 233, 250, 300, 320, 322, 334, 335, 371, 442, 472, 480; RHB 381
  4. Resource Courses (9 hours)
    1. Three hours from: BIO 238; ECH 328, 331; ENG 342, 441; EPS 485; HMS 236, 241; SPA 310
    2. Three hours from: PSY 210, 390; SOC 370
    3. Three hours from: PSY 210 or SOC 370
  5. A minimum of 42 semester hours of residence work, at least 36 hours of which must be advanced.

Minor in Communication Disorders

Minor requirements: SPH 130 and l5-21 hours planned with the minor adviser. The minor must include six semester hours advanced residence credit. Minors do not meet certificate requirements for speech-language pathology positions in the public schools.

Post-Graduate Students

Students who have completed bachelor degrees in other fields of study may enroll in undergraduate communication sciences and disorders courses in preparation for graduate study. These post-graduate students must meet the requirements for admission to the bachelor's degree program listed previously. In order to be eligible to apply to the SFA graduate program, post-graduate students must complete the following courses: SPH 130, 210, 230, 233, 250, 300, 320, 322, 334, 371, 472, 480.

Courses in Education Psychology (EPS)

Unless otherwise indicated, courses are 3 semester hours credit, 3 hours lecture per week.

380.

Educational Psychology - Application of psychological principles to education. Introduces information, issues, theories and concepts involved in the education profession.

400.

Educational Application of Human Development - The study of normal human growth and development through adolescence with an emphasis on the physical, cognitive, social and emotional domains as applied to the education of students.

475.

Special Problems - Individual study of selected topics. Requires permission of supervising professor and department head. Must have prerequisites appropriate to the topic selected. (Credit variable one to three hours.) (a) Educational Psychology topics (b) Rehabilitation topics (c) Special Education topics (d) Speech and Hearing topics

485.

Human Growth and Development - Study of normal growth and development through the entire lifespan, emphasizing the physical, cognitive, social and emotional domains.

Courses in Rehabilitation (RHB)

Unless otherwise indicated, courses are 3 semester hours credit, 3 hours lecture per week.

220.

Introduction to Rehabilitation Services - Survey of the historical development of the present rehabilitation service system. An introduction to the agencies and their services.

222.

Introduction to Alcohol and Other Dependency - Survey of alcohol and other psychoactive chemical substances of abuse in our society, and implications of chemical dependency on the individual, family and society.

325.

Introduction to Working with Persons with a Visual Disability - Study of persons with visual impairments from the standpoint of emotional and intellectual factors, cultural influences and interpersonal relationships.

340.

The Eye, Its Function and Health - Structure, function and possible pathologies of the eye. Social, vocational and educational implications of visual problems together with skills in communicating with medical rehabilitation specialists.

381.

Interviewing and Helping Skills - Introduction to the utilization of interpersonal communication skills in professional settings. Prerequisite: RHB 220.

383.

Psycho-Social Aspects of Disability - Provides an understanding of people with disabilities emphasizing psychological, social and medical aspects.

385.

Clinical Practicum in Rehabilitation - Six semester hours, two hours seminar and 12 hours lab per week. Field instruction in rehabilitation service agencies and programs in the community under the supervision of the field study director and professional staff of the cooperating agency. Prerequisites: RHB 220, 381, 383, and EPS 485.

400.

Beginning Clinical Practicum in Orientation and Mobility - Six semester hours, two hours lecture and 12 hours lab per week. Analysis and implementation of those skills, techniques and principles which enable the visually disabled individual to move independently with safety and efficiency. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor.

401.

Intermediate Clinical Practicum in Orientation and Mobility - Three semester hours, one-hour seminar and six hours of lab per week. Field instruction in orientation and mobility under the supervision of the field study director and professional staff of the field study director and professional staff of the cooperating agency. Prerequisites: RHB 325 and 400.

402.

Advanced Clinical Practicum in Orientation and Mobility - Three semester hours, one-hour seminar and six hours of lab per week. Advanced field instruction in orientation and mobility under the supervision of the field study director and professional staff of the field study director and professional staff of the cooperating agency. (May be taken concurrently with RHB 401.) Prerequisites: RHB 325 and 400.

405.

Rehabilitation Process and Practice - Study of the historical content, philosophical fundamentals, and legislation related to rehabilitation. Also to be accomplished will be a review of the rehabilitation process including intake, assessments, interventions, and outcome. Prerequisites: RHB 220, RHB 383.

407.

Vocational Evaluation, Supported Employment and Job Placement of Persons with Severe Disabilities - Emphasis on services offered by rehabilitation facilities in working with people with severe disabilities. Development of beginning knowledge and skills in vocational evaluation, supported employment and job placement.

422.

Advanced Chemical Substance Use and Abuse - Freedom to expand knowledge and skills in applying interdisciplinary academic theory to professional practice in assessment and treatment of substance abuse. Prerequisite: RHB 222 or consent of professor.

490.

Rehabilitation of Persons with Severe Disabilities - In-depth study of the process of rehabilitation with special emphasis on the severe and multiple disabilities. Prerequisites: RHB 220, 381, 383.

493.

Workshop in Rehabilitation - Offered under one of the following topics: (a) Alcohol-Chemical Abuse (b) The Disabled (c) The Disadvantaged (d) The Visually Impaired (e) Social Service Delivery System (f) Manpower (g) The Aged (h) Community Organization and Services

494.

Seminar in Rehabilitation - Provides the student an opportunity to explore in-depth the varied content covered in rehabilitation practice and to synthesize and integrate the different parts. Prerequisites: RHB 220, 381, 383, 405, 407, EPS 485.

495.

Internship I - Supervised work experience in rehabilitation services agencies. Allows the student to apply personal values, theory and a philosophy of working with people with disabilities in the agency setting. Prerequisite: RHB 385 or RHB 401, 402.

496.

Internship II - Practical work experience as described in RHB 495. Prerequisite: RHB 385 or RHB 401, 402.

Courses in Special Education (SPE)

Unless otherwise indicated, courses are 3 semester hours credit, 3 hours lecture per week.

120.

Introduction to Human Services - An introductory course providing an overview of the following programs: deaf and hard of hearing, communication disorders, rehabilitation services, orientation and mobility, visual impairment and special education.

329.

Survey of Exceptionalities - Introductory course covering the conditions and psychological characteristics of exceptional children. Prerequisites: six hours education, psychology or sociology.

341.

Producing Braille and Nemeth Codes - This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge and skills that enables him/her to transcribe and read Contracted Braille and Nemeth Code. They also are taught to use the slate and stylus. The course culminates with the administration of the Braille Proficiency Test, which must be successfully completed in order to receive a TExES bar code for the Braille exam.

432.

Educational Appraisal of Exceptional Children - Fundamental concepts of measurement with emphasis upon the utility and limitations of various test and assessment procedures. Prerequisites: SPE 329 and EPS 380.

434.

Functional Living Skills for Persons with Disabilities - Addresses issues and procedures in teaching independent living skills to students with disabilities, such as mental retardation, behavior disorders, learning disabilities, physical disabilities and multiple disabilities. Prerequisites: SPE 329, 439.

438.

Academic Instruction for Persons with Disabilities - Addresses effective instructional approaches to help students with disabilities (mental retardation, learning disabilities, behavior disorders) achieve academic goals. Prerequisites: SPE 329, 439.

439.

Introduction to Applied Behavior Analysis - Principles of behavior management for classroom and community use with students with disabilities. Prerequisite: SPE 329.

441.

Working with Students Who Have Visual Impairments in the Academic Setting - This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge about Functional Vision Evaluations/Learning Media Assessment, resource materials, curriculum adaptations, equipment, current theories and techniques for teaching academic students who are blind and visually impaired. Prerequisites: RHB 340, SPE 341.

442.

Working with Persons with Visual and Multiple Impairments - Topics include disabilities other than visual impairment, specific strategies for assessing and planning instruction, Functional Vision Evaluations/Learning Media Assessment, IEPs and IFSPs and working with families.

443.

Student Teaching in Special Education - Three to six semester hours. Senior standing and admission to the Educator Certification Program.

445.

Basic Orientation and Mobility Skills and Concepts - Consideration of the development of children and visually impaired children. Emphasis on body imagery, concept development, spatial awareness and mobility.

460.

Children with Behavioral Disorders - Etiology, characteristics and remediation of behavior disorders of children. Capstone course for special education. Required of all majors and minors. Prerequisites: SPE 329 and nine hours education, psychology or sociology.

461.

Practicum in Special Education - Three semester hours. Enables the student to apply academic experiences in an instructional setting with supervision prior to the student teaching experience. Students must complete 45 contact hours working with children with special needs. (Capstone course and should be taken the semester prior to student teaching.) Prerequisites: SPE 329, 439, 432, 434, 438, and admission to Educator Certification Program.

463.

Consulting with Parents and Professionals - Study of family involvement and ways in which a special education teacher can interact positively with the family and collaborate/consult with other concerned professionals. Prerequisites: Admission to Educator Certification Program (except for non-education majors).

464.

Early Childhood Special Education - Comprehensive overview of the field, including medical aspects of serving young children with disabilities, methods, technology, transition and interagency coordination. Prerequisites: SPE 329.

465.

Educational Programming for Students with Autism - Overview of etiology, research, characteristics, and program components related to children and youth with autism. Discussion of traditional and current causations with subsequent implications drawn for providing appropriate educational interventions. Prerequisite: SPE 329.

466.

Assistive Technology for Individuals with Disabilities - Instruction in the use of technology which enhances learning, functioning and independent living for individuals with disabilities. Focus on both “low-tech” and “high-tech” with an emphasis on new technologies. Prerequisites: SPE 329 or 567.

Courses in Speech and Hearing (SPH)

Unless otherwise indicated, courses are 3 semester hours credit, 3 hours lecture per week.

130.

Introduction to Speech Language Pathology - Overview of various types of communication disorders. Observation in the Speech and Hearing Clinic.

172.

Beginning American Sign Language (ASLI) (SGNL 1301) - Introduction to ASL and deaf culture. Includes principles, methods and techniques for communicating with deaf individuals who use ASL. Emphasis on the development of basic expressive and receptive skills for simple conversation with deaf individuals in ASL. Also includes a brief history of signs.

210.

Phonetics - Detailed study of the phonemes of American English. Proficiency in use of the International Phonetic Alphabet.

230.

Speech Disorders - Introduction to the nature, causes and characteristics of articulation, fluency and voice disorders. Therapeutic strategies for remediation of articulation disorders emphasized. Prerequisites: SPH 130, 210.

233.

Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech Mechanism - Detailed study of the bases of speech including anatomy, physiology, neurology and physics of speech. Prerequisites: SPH 130, 210 or consent of instructor.

250.

Normal Speech and Language Development - Acquaints student with normal acquisition of speech and language from infancy through adolescence, including an introduction to language acquisition theories. Prerequisite: SPH 130 or consent of instructor.

272.

American Sign Language II (SGNL 1302) - Manual communication for the deaf using American Sign Language. Emphasis is placed on fluency and speed. Prerequisite: 80% or better on the SPH 172 comprehensive exam.

274.

Introduction to Deaf Education - Overview of instructional techniques and issues in the education of deaf and hard of hearing children.

300.

Clinical Intervention Methods - Philosophy and methodology of clinical practice in communication disorders. Complete 25 hours of observation in Speech and Hearing Clinic. Prerequisites: SPH 334.

320.

Language Disorders in Infants and Preschoolers - Nature, causes and characteristics of language delay and disorders in infants and preschool children. Therapeutic strategies for stimulation and remediation in this population. Prerequisite: SPH 250.

322.

Language Disorders in School-Age Children and Adolescents - Nature, causes and characteristics of language disorders in school-age children and adolescents. Therapeutic intervention and collaboration with educators emphasized. Prerequisite: SPH 250.

334.

Diagnostic Methods in Speech Pathology - Principles of diagnosis and evaluation. Observation in the Speech and Hearing Clinic. Prerequisites: SPH 230, 320 or 322.

335.

Clinical Experience - Experience in providing clinical assistance in speech language pathology. Prerequisite: SPH 300. Must be taken during final semester of study.

350.

Access to the Phonemic Code - DHH - SPH 350 covers the methods and tools used to give deaf and hard of hearing students access to the phonemic code of English. A discussion of the controversy surrounding these issues, as well as their strengths and weaknesses, is also a portion of this course. We will discuss maintenance/troubleshooting of amplification devices, reading audiograms, basic principles of audiology, and the issues surrounding the education of students with cochlear implants. Other topics include: ARD Process, IEP’s, Cued Speech, Bi-Bi Approach, Visual Phonics, Fingerspelling, and other topics that might arise via discussion/need. Prerequisite: SPH 274 (Course grade of B or better).

371.

Introduction to Audiology - Study of the anatomy of hearing and diagnostic techniques to determine hearing loss. Prerequisite: SPH 210 or consent of the instructor.

414.

Deaf Culture - This course covers the beliefs, values, and expected behaviors of the deaf community. Special emphasis is placed on educational and interpreting implications.

442.

Seminar in Speech and Language Methods - Methods and techniques related to the role of speech language pathologists or teachers of deaf/hard-of-hearing children in public school settings. Prerequisite: For majors in deaf/hard-of-hearing: 50 documented observation hours in programs for deaf/hard-of-hearing students. For majors in speech-language pathology: SPH 230.

470.

Language for the Deaf - Comparison of language development for hearing and deaf/hard-of-hearing children. Emphasis on structural approach to teaching deaf/hard-of-hearing children. Analysis of deaf/hard-of-hearing children’s language samples and developing and/or improving their grammar skills. Prerequisites: SPH 173, 274.

471.

Advanced Language for the Deaf - Research language of deaf/hard of hearing, formal and informal assessment of language for prescriptive remediation for clinical purposes, adapting and infusing clinical strategies in the content areas. Prerequisites: SPH 350, 470.

472.

Aural/Oral Habilitation of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing - Techniques for teaching speech reading and oral communication. Prerequisites: SPH 210, 230, 371 or by consent of professor.

476.

Literacy Development for the Deaf - Enhances literary development by using Whole Language Approach, Basal, Key Word, Sight Word. Course includes factors influencing literacy environment, Whole Language terms, beginning literacy for deaf/hard-of-hearing children, literacy inventories, experience stories, assessing literacy skills (concerns, comparisons, development), selecting and analyzing stories, miscue analysis, comparisons of literacy enhancement approaches and applications to the deaf/hard-of-hearing. Prerequisites: SPH 173, 274, 350, 470.

477.

American Sign Language III - Continuation of ASL II. Includes the integration of ASL expressive and receptive skills using bilingual techniques. Also includes vocabulary expansion, idioms manual and non-manual aspects of ASL, ASL linguistics, cross-cultural communication, and cultural knowledge. Prerequisite: 80% or better on an exit interview and on the comprehensive exam in SPH 272.

478.

Manual Communication Interpreting - Emphasis on syntax, fluency, and educational interpreting skills, and ethics. Facilitating understanding of various rules, ethics, and responsibilities of interpreters and students using interpreters. Prerequisite: B or better in SPH 479.

479.

American Sign Language IV - Continuation of ASL III. Continues vocabulary expansion, idioms, manual and non-manual aspects of ASL, ASL linguistics, cross-cultural communication and cultural knowledge. At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to communicate fluently with native ASL signers. Prerequisite: B or better in SPH 477.

480.

Neurological Bases of Communication - Structure and function of the human nervous system as related to speech-language production and auditory processing. Prerequisite: SPH 233.

483.

Educational Interpreting/Transliteration - Designed to develop skills in expressive interpretation and transliteration, the process of transmitting spoken English into any one of several English-oriented varieties of manual communication between deaf and hearing people. Focus on consecutive order prior to interpretation. Utilization of skills in greater fluency and strategies in interpreting through transliteration. Prerequisite: B or better in SPH 479.