Stephen F. Austin State University

Courses

The mission of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry is to educate students in a way that will allow them to graduate as lifelong learners that are well prepared for their chosen careers. The objectives of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry are:

  1. to prepare students for graduate and/or professional schools (e.g., medical);
  2. to prepare students for positions in industry, government service, and teaching;
  3. to allow science students with non-chemistry majors to relate chemistry to their major science;
  4. to acquaint non-science students with the methods, concepts, and achievements of the science of chemistry.

The chemistry and biochemistry curricula have the approval of the American Chemical Society for training professional chemists. The chemistry and biochemistry programs are designed to be flexible which allows students to choose electives best suited for their future career goals. Students completing the American Chemical Society certified Bachelor of Science degrees in chemistry or biochemistry can pursue opportunities in various industrial labs across the country or can continue their education in graduate school. Students interested in professional schools, chemistry associated industries, secondary education or other options may pursue the Bachelor of Science non-certified degrees. These degrees are designed to prepare students interested in careers combining the knowledge of chemistry with other areas.

The Department's two undergraduate majors in biochemistry and chemistry and its graduate degree all share common goals and objectives for student outcomes but at different levels of expectation. Graduates of our programs will:

Displayed are the course descriptions of chemistry courses taught at SFA. A curriculum map of a biochemistry or chemistry major is available. Each course has course objectives and student learning outcomes associated with it and are linked to the title of each course. The student learning outcomes are assessed and evaluated yearly.

Co-requisite Courses

Courses that are co-requisites must be taken together during the same semester. Separate grades will be awarded for these courses. Withdrawal from one corequisite course requires the dropping of the other course. A student is not required to repeat a corequisite course for which the student has received a passing grade.

Course Credit

A minimum grade of C is required in all courses that are prerequisites to a chemistry course. Unless otherwise indicated, courses are three semester hours credit, three hours lecture per week.

Undergraduate Courses

100. Preparation for General Chemistry - Designed for students whose marginal background in chemistry would not allow them to succeed in CHE 133. Review basic math and chemistry principles for students deficient or insecure in these areas. Topics covered will include, but will not be limited to, scientific calculations, atomic structure and the periodic table, gas laws, and reaction stoichiometry. Recommended for all students who wish to enroll in CHE 133 but who do not meet the prerequisities or did not have high school chemistry. Note this course does not meet any requirements for any degree. (F)

Chemistry 100
Preparation for General Chemistry

Course Description:
CHE 100 is a course designed for those students whose marginal background in chemistry would not allow them to succeed in CHE 133. This course is designed to review basic math and chemistry principles for students deficient or insecure in these areas. Topics covered will include, but will not be limited to, scientific calculations, atomic structure and the periodic table, gas laws and reaction stoichiometry.

Number of Credit Hours: 3 credit hours, 3 hours lecture per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Program Learning Outcomes:
There are no specific program learning outcomes for this major addressed in this course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives:
There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective:
To provide a developmental course designed to review basic math and chemistry principles for students deficient or insecure in these areas.

Student Learning Outcomes:
Students will be able to apply the following principles:
• The scientific method; critical reading and note taking.
• Nomenclature and the periodic table; the language of chemistry.
• Mathematical logic; comparison of chemical and physical properties.
• Chemical calculations - word problems; stoichiometry and gas laws.

Outline of Topics:
Week Content/Skills Taught % Time
1 Reading Scientific Material; Note taking; Study Habits; 2-10%
Scientific Method; Quiz 1
2 Atomic Structure; Micro/Macro Viewpoints; Quiz 2 2-10%
3 The Periodic Table; Analytical Thinking; Quiz 3 2-10%
4 Chemical Calculations; Unit Analysis; Quiz 4 2-10%
5 Chemical Calculations - Word Problems; Quiz 5 2-10%
6 Gas Laws and Chemical Calculations; Midterm Exam 2-10%
7 Gas Laws Continued; Quiz 6 2-10%
8 Chemical Bonding and Nomenclature; Quiz 7 2-10%
9 Reactions Stoichiometry; Critical Thinking; Quiz 8 2-10%
10 Reaction Stoichiometry; Quiz 9 2-10%
11 Reaction Stoichiometry - Gas Laws; Quiz 10 2-10%
12 Solutions and Solution Calculations; Quiz 11 2-10%
13 Solutions - Reaction Stoichiometry Quiz 12 2-10%
14 Applications of Chemistry in Society; Review 2-10%
15 Final Exam

Assessment:
• Assessment of the scientific method, critical reading and note taking can be assessed through word problems involving a paragraph of necessary and extraneous information to solve simple chemistry problems.
• Quizzes over nomenclature and the periodic table would be used to assess the student comprehension of the language of chemistry.
• Quizzes over unit conversions (grams to moles, etc.) and comparative relationships (electronegativity rules, stoichiometry, and gas laws, etc.) would be used to evaluate student comprehension of mathematics in chemistry.

111. Introductory Chemistry I (CHEM 1305) - Introduction to the principles and concepts of chemical thought. Corequisite: CHE 111L. Prerequisite: Eligibility for MTH 138. (F, Sp, Sum I, Sum II)

CHE 111

Introductory Chemistry I

Course Description: Introduction to the principles and concepts of chemical thought.

Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Eligibility for MTH 138. Corequisite: CHE 111L

Program Learning Outcomes: There are no specific program learning outcomes for this major addressed in this course. This course is a general education core curriculum course and a service course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives:

Course Objective: The course objective is for students to gain competency (in recognizing concepts and problem solving) in basic areas of general chemistry as suited for the non-science major.

Student Learning Outcomes: The student is expected to recognize and apply the following concepts to problem solving:

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):

111L. Introductory Chemistry I Laboratory (CHEM 1105) - Introductory laboratory experiments. Co-requisite: CHE 111. Lab fee required. (F, Sp, Sum I, Sum II)

CHE 111L

Introductory Chemistry I Laboratory

Course Description: Introductory laboratory experiments.

Number of Credit Hours: 1 semester hour - 2 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Co-requisite: CHE 111. Lab fee required.

Program Learning Outcomes: There are no specific program learning outcomes for this major addressed in this course. This course is a general education core curriculum course and a service course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives:

Course Objective: To provide students with an explanation of the basic principles of chemistry as illustrated through laboratory experiments and to apply these principles to laboratory work involving critical thinking.

Student Learning Outcomes: The student is expected to recognize and apply the following concepts to problem solving in a laboratory setting.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):

112. Introductory Chemistry II (CHEM 1307) - Elementary organic and biochemical systems. Prerequisites: CHE 111 and 111L. Corequisite: CHE 112L. (Sp, Sum I)

Chemistry 112
Introductory Chemistry II

Course Description: Elementary organic and biochemical systems.

Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 111 and 111L. Corequisite: CHE 112L

Program Learning Outcomes: There are no specific program learning outcomes for this major addressed in this course. This course is a general education core curriculum course and a service course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives:
• To understand and apply method and appropriate technology to the study of natural sciences.
• To recognize scientific and quantitative methods and the differences between these approaches and other methods of inquiry and to communicate findings, analyses, and interpretation both orally and in writing.
• To demonstrate knowledge of the major issues and problems facing modern science, including issues that touch upon ethics, values, and public policies.
• To demonstrate knowledge of the interdependence of science and technology and their influence on, and contribution to, modern culture.

Course Objective: To provide students with an explanation of the basic principles of chemistry and to apply these principles to problem solving involving critical thinking.

Student Learning Outcomes: The student is expected to recognize and apply the following basic principles to problem solving:
• Basic recognition of molecular structure relating to the classification of organic compounds and functional groups.
• Basic vocabulary relating to the common and IUPAC names of simple organic and biochemical compounds.
• Basic principles of writing chemical equations for organic and biochemical reactions.
• Basic relationships between physical properties and molecular structure of organic and biochemical compounds.
• Basic principles of the chemistry of lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Alkanes (5-15%)
Unsaturated Hydrocarbons (5-15%)
Alcohols, Ethers, Phenols, and Thiols (5-15%)
Aldehydes and Ketones (5-15%)
Carboxylic Acids and Carboxylic Acid Derivatives (5-15%)
Amines and Amides (5-15%)
Carbohydrates (5-15%)
Lipids (5-15%)
Amino Acids, Proteins and Enzymes (5-15%)
Metabolic Pathways and Energy Production (5-15%)

112L. Introductory Chemistry II Laboratory (CHEM 1107) - One semester hour, two hours lab per week. Introductory organic laboratory experiments. Prerequisites: CHE 111 and 111L. Corequisite: CHE 112. Lab fee required. (Sp, Sum I)

Chemistry 112L
Introductory Laboratory II

Course Description: Introductory organic laboratory experiments.

Number of Credit Hours: 1 semester hours - 2 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 111 and 111L. Co-requisite: CHE 112. Lab fee required.

Program Learning Outcomes: There are no specific program learning outcomes for this major addressed in this course. This course is a general education core curriculum course and a service course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives:
• To understand and apply method and appropriate technology to the study of natural sciences.
• To recognize scientific and quantitative methods and the differences between these approaches and other methods of inquiry and to communicate findings, analyses, and interpretation both orally and in writing.
• To demonstrate knowledge of the major issues and problems facing modern science, including issues that touch upon ethics, values, and public policies.
• To demonstrate knowledge of the interdependence of science and technology and their influence on, and contribution to, modern culture.

Course Objective: To provide students with an explanation of the basic principles of chemistry as illustrated through laboratory experiments and to apply these principles to laboratory work involving critical thinking.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, the students are expected to
• demonstrate their level of competency in reading by successfully completing laboratory exercises after reading instructions and information concerning laboratory experiments.
• demonstrate ability to write in a clear organized manner.
• listen to verbal instructions about experimental procedure and then correctly complete the laboratory assignment.
• demonstrate critical thinking.
• find information pertaining to laboratory experiments using computer technology.
• demonstrate the ability to use technology by correctly using a balance.
• be introduced to issues that relate to ethics and public policy.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Safety (1 lab day)
Modeling Organic Compounds (1 lab day)
Testing of Hydrocarbons (1 lab day)
Fats, Oils, and Soap (1 lab day)
Preparation of Sulfanilamide (1 lab day)
Testing Alcohols and Phenols (1 lab day)
Testing Aldehydes and Ketones (1 lab day)
Testing Carboxylic Acids and Esters (1 lab day)
Testing Amines and Amides (1 lab day)
Carbohydrates (1 lab day)
Analysis of Milk (1 lab day)
Dyes and Dying (1 lab day)
Analysis of an Egg (1 lab day)

125. Introductory Physical Science - Four semester hours, three hours lecture, two hours lab per week. Presents introductory concepts in physics and chemistry. Seamless combination of content and interactive lectures with hands-on laboratory exercises to give both conceptual and kinetic understanding of physical science principles. Not open to students who have received credit in PHY 125. This course is designed for education majors only and will not satisfy graduation requirements for any other major. Corequisite: CHE 125L. (F, Sp)

Chemistry 125
Introductory Physical Science

Course Description: Presents introductory concepts in physics and chemistry. Seamless combination of content and interactive lectures with hands-on laboratory exercises to give both conceptual and kinetic understanding of physical science principles. Not open to students who have received credit in PHY 125. This course is designed for education majors only and will not satisfy graduation requirements for any other major.

Number of Credit Hours: 4 semester hours - 3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Co-requisite: CHE 125L.

Program Learning Outcomes: There are no specific program learning outcomes for this major addressed in this course. This course is a general education core curriculum course and a service course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives:
• To understand and apply method and appropriate technology to the study of natural sciences.
• To recognize scientific and quantitative methods and the differences between these approaches and other methods of inquiry and to communicate findings, analyses, and interpretation both orally and in writing.
• To identify and recognize the differences among competing scientific theories.
• To demonstrate knowledge of the major issues and problems facing modern science, including issues that touch upon ethics, values, and public policies.
• To demonstrate knowledge of the interdependence of science and technology and their influence on, and contribution to, modern culture.

Course Objective:
• Demonstrate the methods used to observe and measure the physical parameters associated with matter and mechanics
• Recognize the atomic structure of matter
• Recognize chemical reactions and bonding
• Recognize how chemistry & physics relates to the everyday world
• Develop measurement skills using metric units

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, the students are expected to demonstrate the following:
• Metric measuring skills
The student will demonstrate skill in using instruments to measure the physical properties of matter in metric units. Instruments include: meter stick; measuring cup, balance; stopwatch; spring balance.
• Graphical analysis of data
The student will be able to analyze graphs to determine the value of physical parameters or the relationship between physical parameters.
• Measure physical parameters
The student will be able to use instruments to measure the speed of an object.
• Atomic structure of matter
The student will be able to identify the three subatomic particles, their location, charge and relative mass
• Chemical reactions and bonding
The student will be able to distinguish between a chemical and physical change and recognize the difference between ionic and covalent bonding
• Chemistry and physics in the everyday world
The student will recognize how chemistry and physics relates to the ordinary world by the preparation of an activities notebook.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Introduction (1 class period)
Scientific Method (1 class period)
Solids-Liquids-Gasses (1 class period)
Fluids (1 class period)
Metric Measurements (1 class period)
Graphing (1 class period)
Volume Measurements (1 class period)
Measuring Mass (1 class period)
Straight Line (1 class period)
Density (1 class period)
Measuring Density (1 class period)
Measuring Force (1 class period)
Work (1 class period)
Power (1 class period)
Energy (1 class period)
Structure of the Atom (1 class period)
Periodic Table (1 class period)
Ionic and Covalent Bonding (1 class period)
Solutions and Compounds (1 class period)
Acids and Bases (1 class period)
Chemical Reactions (1 class period)
Kinematics (1 class period)
Acceleration (1 class period)
Inertia and Force (1 class period)
Newton's 2nd Law (1 class period)
Newton's 3rd Law (1 class period)

133. General Chemistry I (CHEM 1311) - Atomic and molecular structures, stoichiometry, gas laws, and thermodynamics. Corequisite: CHE 133L. Prerequisite: MTH 138 or concurrent enrollment. (F, Sp, Sum I)

Chemistry 133
General Chemistry I

Course Description: Atomic and molecular structures, stoichiometry, gas laws and thermodynamics.

Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: MTH 138 or concurrent enrollment. Corequisite: CHE 133L.

Program Learning Outcomes: There are no specific program learning outcomes for this major addressed in this course. This course is a general education core curriculum course and a service course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives:
• To understand and apply method and appropriate technology to the study of natural sciences.
• To recognize scientific and quantitative methods and the differences between these approaches and other methods of inquiry and to communicate findings, analyses, and interpretation both orally and in writing.
• To demonstrate knowledge of the major issues and problems facing modern science, including issues that touch upon ethics, values, and public policies.
• To demonstrate knowledge of the interdependence of science and technology and their influence on, and contribution to, modern culture.

Course Objective: To provide students with an explanation of the basic concepts of chemistry and to apply these concepts to problem solving involving critical thinking.

Student Learning Outcomes: The student is expected to recognize and apply the following basic concepts to problem solving:
• Basic statistical methods used in chemistry such as significant figures, accuracy/precision, and uncertainty in measurements.
• Basic vocabulary used in chemistry such as nomenclature, notations for isotopes, and classification of matter.
• Basic calculations used in chemistry such as stoichiometry, gas laws, and thermochemistry.
• Basic structure of molecular and atomic systems used in chemistry such as Lewis structures, molecular geometry, bonding theories, and periodic trends.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Chemistry and Measurement (5-15%)
Atoms, Elements, Molecules, Ions, and Compounds (5-15%)
Chemical Formulas and Equations (5-15%)
Chemical Reactions (5-15%)
Gases (5-15%)
Thermochemistry (5-15%)
Quantum Theory of the Atom (5-15%)
Periodic Properties of the Elements (5-15%)
Chemical Bonding - Lewis Structures (5-15%)
Molecular Geometry and Bonding Theory (5-15%)
Liquids, Solids, and Intermolecular Forces (5-15%)
Solutions (5-15%)

133L. General Chemistry I Laboratory (CHEM 1111) - One semester hour, three hours laboratory per week. Spectroscopy, quantitative experiments. Corequisite: CHE 133. Lab fee required. (F, Sp, Sum I)

Chemistry 133L
General Chemistry I Laboratory

Course Description: Spectroscopy, quantitative experiments.

Number of Credit Hours: 1 semester hour - 3 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Co-requisite: CHE 133. Lab fee required.

Program Learning Outcomes: There are no specific program learning outcomes for this major addressed in this course. This course is a general education core curriculum course and a service course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives:
• To understand and apply method and appropriate technology to the study of natural sciences.
• To recognize scientific and quantitative methods and the differences between these approaches and other methods of inquiry and to communicate findings, analyses, and interpretation both orally and in writing.
• To demonstrate knowledge of the major issues and problems facing modern science, including issues that touch upon ethics, values, and public policies.
• To demonstrate knowledge of the interdependence of science and technology and their influence on, and contribution to, modern culture.

Course Objective: The student will demonstrate basic laboratory techniques and be able to apply them in a practical chemistry setting.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, the students are expected to
• recognize how to determine the significance of a laboratory instrument.
• demonstrate measuring techniques with glassware and top loading balances.
• use CBL systems.
• demonstrate graphing techniques.
• use both quantitative and qualitative techniques.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Safety (1 lab day)
Identification of an Unknown Solid (1 lab day)
Measuring Liquids and Volumes (1 lab day)
Chromatography of M&M Candies (1 lab day)
Formula of a Hydrate (1 lab day)
Prep and Standardization of NaOH Solution (1 lab day)
Acid/Base Titration (1/2 lab day)
Vinegar Analysis (1/2 lab day)
Endothermic and Exothermic Reactions (1 lab day)
Gas Laws (1 lab day)
Heat of Fusion of Ice (1 lab day)
The Enthalpy of Neutralization of Phosphoric Acid (1 lab day)
Water Hardness (1 lab day)

134. General Chemistry II (CHEM 1312) - Equilibrium, kinetics, redox, descriptive chemistry and radiochemistry. Prerequisites: CHE 133, 133L and MTH 138. Corequisite: CHE 134L (F, Sp, Sum II)

Chemistry 134
General Chemistry II

Course Description: Equilibrium, kinetics, redox, descriptive chemistry and radiochemistry.

Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHE 133, 133L, and MTH 138. Corequisite: CHE 134L.

Program Learning Outcomes: There are no specific program learning outcomes for this major addressed in this course. This course is a general education core curriculum course and a service course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives:
• To understand and apply method and appropriate technology to the study of natural sciences.
• To recognize scientific and quantitative methods and the differences between these approaches and other methods of inquiry and to communicate findings, analyses, and interpretation both orally and in writing.
• To demonstrate knowledge of the major issues and problems facing modern science, including issues that touch upon ethics, values, and public policies.
• To demonstrate knowledge of the interdependence of science and technology and their influence on, and contribution to, modern culture.

Course Objective: To provide students with an explanation of the basic principles of chemistry and to apply these principles to problem solving involving critical thinking.

Student Learning Outcomes: The student is expected to recognize and apply the following basic principles to problem solving:
• Basic principles of reaction rates used in chemistry such as experimental determination of rate, dependence of rate on concentration, change of concentration with time, and reaction mechanisms.
• Basic principles of equilibrium used in chemistry such as describing chemical equilibrium, using the equilibrium constant, changing the reaction conditions; Le Chatelier's Principle, and solubility equilbria.
• Basic principles of acid-bases and acid-base equilibria used in chemistry such as acid-base concepts, acid-base strengths, self-ionization of water and pH, solutions of weak acid or bases, and solutions of weak acid or base with another solute (buffers, titration curves).
• Basic principles of thermodynamics used in chemistry such as enthalpy and the first law of thermodynamics, entropy and the second law of thermodynamics, the third of thermodynamics, and Gibbs free energy.
• Basic principles of electrochemistry used in chemistry such as half reactions, voltaic cells, and electrolytic cells.
• Basic principles of nuclear chemistry used in chemistry such as radioactivity and nuclear bombardment reactions.)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Chemical Kinetics (5-15%)
Chemical Equilibrium (5-15%)
Acids and Bases (5-15%)
Acid-Base Equilibria (5-15%)
Solubility and Complex-Ion Equilibria (5-15%)
Thermodynamics and Entropy(5-15%)
Electrochemistry (5-15%)
Nuclear Chemistry (1-15%)
Organic (0-15%)
Biochemistry (0-15%)
Nonmetals (0-15%)
Metals and Metallurgy (0-15%)
Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds (0-15%)

134L. General Chemistry II Laboratory (CHEM 1112) - One semester hour, three hours laboratory per week. Kinetics, spectrophotometry, quantitative / qualitative experiments. Prerequisites: CHE 133, 133L. Corequisite: CHE 134. Lab fee required. (F, Sp, Sum II)

Chemistry 134L
General Chemistry II Laboratory


Course Description: Kinetics, spectrophotometry, quantitative/qualitative experiments.

Number of Credit Hours: 1 semester hour - 3 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHE 133 and 133L. Co-requisite: CHE 134. Lab fee required.

Program Learning Outcomes: There are no specific program learning outcomes for this major addressed in this course. This course is a general education core curriculum course and a service course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives:
• To understand and apply method and appropriate technology to the study of natural sciences.
• To recognize scientific and quantitative methods and the differences between these approaches and other methods of inquiry and to communicate findings, analyses, and interpretation both orally and in writing.
• To demonstrate knowledge of the major issues and problems facing modern science, including issues that touch upon ethics, values, and public policies.
• To demonstrate knowledge of the interdependence of science and technology and their influence on, and contribution to, modern culture.

Course Objective: To provide students with an explanation of the basic concepts, laws and theories of chemistry and to apply them to chemistry problems through a laboratory setting. The student will demonstrate basic laboratory techniques and be able to apply them in a practical chemistry setting.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, the students are expected to
• apply chemistry concepts to problem solving.
• apply quantitative methods to problem solving.
• demonstrate the knowledge of issues facing modern science, and have the confidence and laboratory skills needed to complete routine experiments.
• demonstrate the knowledge of the influence of modern technology on chemistry by using instrumentation to collect data during laboratory experiments.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Orientation, Lab Safety (1 lab day)
Volumetric Analysis: Acid-Base Titration (1 lab day)
Volumetric Analysis: Total Hardness of Water by EDTA s (1 lab day)
Volumetric Analysis: Redox Titration s (1 lab day)
Kinetics: Determination of the order of a Reaction (1 lab day)
Spectrophotometric Analysis: Concentration of a Solution Using Beer's Law (1 lab day)
Spectrophotometric Analysis: Iron in Vitamin Pills and in Water (1 lab day)
Spectrophotometric Analysis: Determination of the Equilibrium Constant for a Reaction (1 lab day)
Acid-Base Equilibria: Ionization Constant of an Acid (1 lab day)
Qualitative Analysis: An Alternative Approach (1 lab day)
Qualitative Analysis: Chemical Sleuthing of a Set of Solutions (1 lab day)
Synthesis: Preparation of Alum (1 lab day)

231. Quantitative Analysis - Four semester hours, three hours lecture, three hours lab per week. Analytical applications of solution chemistry. Prerequisites: CHE 134, 134L. Lab fee required. (Sp)

Chemistry 231
Quantitative Analysis

Course Description: Analytical applications of solution chemistry.

Number of Credit Hours: 4 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 134 and 134L. Lab fee required.

Program Learning Outcomes:
1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: To provide students with a more detailed explanation of the basic concepts, laws, and theories of some of the topics discussed in General Chemistry and to apply the knowledge to chemistry problem solving at an advanced level. The student will develop an appreciation for chemistry as it relates to the other disciplines. Furthermore, the student will recognize how chemistry provides solutions to contemporary, historical, technological, and societal issues.

Student Learning Outcomes: The student is expected to recognize and apply the fundamental and practical aspects of the following concepts and apply the concepts to problem solving:
• units of measure, unit conversions, density, and definitions of matter (PLO 1)
• introduction to the analysis of real samples and the difficulties involved in handling real samples such as sampling, preparation, decomposition, dissolution, and the elimination of interferences (PLO 1)
• principles of experimental error in chemical analysis including the sources of experimental errors and the application of statistics to data treatment and evaluation using spreadsheets (PLO 1, 2)
• concept of gravimetric analysis including experimental aspects of this type of analysis and the use of gravimetric factor in calculations (PLO 1, 2)
• principles of titrimetric methods of analysis, with emphasis on dilution of solutions, the theory of neutralization, titration curves for complex acid/base systems, precipitation titrimetry, oxidation/reduction titrations, potentiometric titrations, and complex-formation titrations (PLO 1, 2)
• properties of aqueous solutions, including activity of ions, application of the Debye-Huckel equation to thermodynamic equilibrium constant (PLO 1, 2)
• concept of equilibrium as it applies to complex systems and chemical analysis,
• principles of electrochemistry including standard electrode potentials, the Nernst equation, and the theory of potentiometry, electrogravimetry, coulometry, voltammetry (PLO 1, 2)
• basic principles of spectrochemical methods of analysis, with emphasis on ultraviolet and visible absorption spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and the application of Beer's Law in problem solving and analysis (PLO 1, 2)
• concepts of chromatography with the main emphasis on liquid and gas chromatography, response factors, and as time permits, the van Deemter equation (PLO 1, 2)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Introduction to Analytical Chemistry (5-15%)
Errors and Statistical Data Treatment in Chemical Analysis (5-15%)
Sampling, Standardization, and Calibration (5-15%)
Aqueous Solutions and Chemical Equilibria (5-15%)
Effects of Electrolytes on Chemical Equilibria (5-15%)
Solving Equilibrium Calculations for Complex Systems (5-15%)
Gravimetric Analysis (5-15%)
Titrimetric Methods (5-15%)
Neutralization Titrations (5-15%)
Titration Curves (5-15%)
Complexation Reactions and Titrations (5-15%)
Electrochemistry (5-15%)
Potentiometry and Voltammetry (5-15%)
Spectroscopy (5-15%)
Chromatography (5-15%)



Chemistry 231L
Quantitative Analysis Lab

Course Description: Analytical applications of solution chemistry.

Number of Credit Hours: 0 semester hours - 3 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 134 and 134L. Lab fee required.

Program Learning Outcomes:
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
3. The student will perform qualitative/quantitative chemical analyses/syntheses using modern instrumentation.
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: In this course, the students will demonstrate their laboratory skills and problem solving ability. Students will demonstrate laboratory techniques that are applied to quantitative analysis of chemical samples and solution chemistry. The basics of statistics related to analytical chemistry will be applied by the students. When possible the analyses will be related to practical problem solving of contemporary, historical, technological, and societal issues.

Student Learning Outcomes: The student is expected to demonstrate and apply the following concepts to problem solving:
• The calculations involved in the preparation of solutions using solid and liquid solutes.
• The basics of gravimetric analysis that involve preparing, collecting, treating, and weighing a precipitate and the use of a gravimetric factor in calculations.
• The techniques involved in volumetric chemical analysis with emphasis on solution preparation and dilution and chemical calculations involved in volumetric analysis
• Principles of endpoint detection emphasizing indicators and potentiometric methods.
• Principles of Kjeldahl analyses with associated calculations, titrations, catalyses, and standardization procedures.
• The basic techniques in atomic absorption analyses and Beer's Law and its application.
• The basics of chromatography involving gas and liquid partitioning and the van Deemter equation.
• Principles of electrogravimetric analysis that involves special sample preparation using fuming solutions with sulfuric acid.
• Principles of complexiometric titration with EDTA as titrant.
• Techniques in infrared spectroscopy and the application of absorbance measurements and their relationship to concentration.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Orientation and Safety (1 lab period)
Gravimetric Analysis of a Soluble Salt (2 lab periods)
Volumetric Determination of the Percent Na2O in a Soda Ash Sample (2 lab periods)
Analysis of Ammonium Ion (1 lab period)
Complexiometric Determination of Calcium in Powdered Milk (1 lab period)
Potentiometric Determination of the Percentage of Chloride (1 lab period)
Gas Chromatography (1 lab period)
Atomic Absorption (1 lab period)
Electrogravimetric Determination (1 lab period)
Ion Chromatography and HPLC (1 lab period)

241. Inorganic Chemistry - Fundamental concepts of the descriptive inorganic chemistry of the elements. Prerequisites: CHE 134, 134L. Corequisite: CHE 241L (F)

Chemistry 241
Inorganic Chemistry

Course Description: Fundamental concepts of the descriptive inorganic chemistry of the elements.

Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 134 and 134L. Co-requisite: CHE 241L.

Program Learning Outcomes:
1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The objective of this class is to give you a basic explanation of descriptive inorganic chemistry and to apply this knowledge to problem solving involving critical thinking.

Student Learning Outcomes: The student will need to recognize and apply the following basic principles to problem solving:
• The student will need to apply the basic principles of periodic law as used in chemistry to make predictions concerning the properties of selected elements. (PLO 1, 2)
• The student will need to illustrate an understanding of the relative properties of the elements within a family of the representative elements. (PLO 1, 2)
• The student will need to demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles radioactivity. (PLO 1, 2)
• The student will need to apply the basic principles of crystal field theory. (PLO 1, 2)
• The student will need to illustrate an understanding of the relative properties of the elements within a family of transition elements. (PLO 1, 2)
• The student will need to demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of symmetry. (PLO 1, 2)

Outline of Topics (approximate number of lectures*):
Introduction - Visualizing the Periodic Table 1
The Development of the Periodic Table and Periodic Law 2
Hydrogen 2
The Alkali Metals 2
The Alkaline Earth Metals 1
The Boron Family 1
The Carbon Family 2
The Nitrogen Family (the Pnicogens) 2
The Oxygen Family (the Chalcogens) 1
The Halogens 2
The Noble Gases 1
Nuclear Chemistry 2
The Genesis and the Abundances of the Elements 1
Distribution of the Elements 1
Hard and Soft Acids and Bases 1
Coordination Compounds 1
Scandium, Yttrium, Lanthanides, and Actinides 3
The Titanium Group 1
The Vanadium Group 1
The Chromium Group 1
The Manganese Group 1
Iron, Cobalt and Nickel 1
The Platinum Metals 1
The Copper Family (the Coinage Metals) 1
The Zinc Family 1
Periodicity Revisited 1
Symmetry 1
Electronic Spectra 2
Laboratory 4

*All lecture numbers are ±1.

241L. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory - One semester hour, three hours lab per week. Study of syntheses and reactions of inorganic chemistry. Prerequisites: CHE 134, 134L. Corequisite: CHE 241. Required lab fee. (F)

Chemistry 241L
Inorganic Chemistry Lab

Course Description: Study of syntheses and reactions of inorganic chemistry.

Number of Credit Hours: 1 semester hour - 3 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHE 134 and 134L. Co-requisite: CHE 241. Required lab fee.

Program Learning Outcomes:
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
3. The student will perform qualitative/quantitative chemical analyses/syntheses using modern instrumentation.
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The objective of this class is to give you a basic explanation of descriptive inorganic chemistry and to apply this knowledge to problem solving involving critical thinking.

Student Learning Outcomes: On completion of this course, the student will recognize and apply the following basic principles to problem solving:
• Recognize and apply chemistry concepts to problem solving. (PLO 2)
• Recognize and apply quantitative methods to problem solving. (PLO 2)
• Exhibit the ability of problem solving; recognize the knowledge of issues facing modern science, and have the confidence and laboratory skills needed to complete routine experiments. (PLO 3)
• Recognize the knowledge of influence of modern technology on chemistry by using instrumentation to collect data during laboratory experiments. (PLO 5)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
There are 14 lab periods, each with one or two experiments:

Check-in Experiment 1
Experiment 2, Experiment 4
Experiment 6, Experiment 7
Experiment 9, Experiment 10
Experiment 13, Experiment 17
Experiment 18
Experiment 22
Experiments 23 (*), 29
Experiments 24 (*), 25
Experiments 28 (*), 31 (*)
Experiments 26 (*), 27
Experiments 32 (*), 33
Experiments 35 (*), 38 (*)
Experiment 37 Check-out

*This is a Survey Reaction. Each survey takes 15-45 minutes with one lab report required that summarizes all the survey observations.

1. Periodicity - The Activity Series
2. Hydrogen - The Properties of Acids
4. Hydrogen - The Preparation and Reducing Properties of Hydrogen
6. Alkali Metals - Reactivity of Lithium, Sodium, and Potassium
7. Alkali Metals - Preparation of Sodium and Potassium Soaps
9. Group IIIA - Amphoteric Properties of Aluminum Hydroxide
10. Group IIIA - The Preparation of Alum
13. Group VA - The Generation and Properties of Ammonia
17. Group VIA - Sulfur Compounds
18. Group VIA - Synthesis and Reactions of Oxygen Gas
22. Group VIIA - Oxidation States of Chlorine
23. Group IIIB - Survey of Yttrium, Lanthanum, and Cerium
24. Group IVB - Survey of Titanium
25. Group IVB - Preparation of Titanium(III) Chloride
26. Group VB - Survey of Vanadium
27. Group VB - Oxidation States of Vanadium
28. Group VIB - Survey of Chromium
29. Group VIB - Densities of Chromium, Molybdenum, and Tungsten
31. Group VIIB - Survey of Manganese
32. Group VIIIB - Survey of Iron, Cobalt, and Nickel
33. Group VIIIB - Preparation of Potassium Trisoxalatoferrate(III) Trihydrate
35. Group IB - Survey of Copper
37. Group IB - Copper Cycle
38. Group IIB - Survey of Zinc

271. Special Topics in Chemistry - Special studies in chemistry. May be repeated once on a different topic. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. (F, Sp, Sum I, Sum II)

Chemistry 271
Special Topics in Chemistry

Course Description: Special studies in chemistry. May be repeated once on a different topic.

Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Program Learning Outcomes: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

Course Objective: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

Student Learning Outcomes: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Same as the course being substituted with this course.

271L. Special Topics in Chemistry Laboratory - One semester hour, three hours laboratory per week. Special studies in chemistry laboratory techniques. May be repeated once on a different topic. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Required lab fee. (F, Sp, Sum I, Sum II)

Chemistry 271L
Special Topics Lab

Course Description: Special studies in chemistry laboratory techniques. May be repeated once on a different topic.

Number of Credit Hours: 1 semester hours - 3 hours lab per week.

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Required lab fee.

Program Learning Outcomes: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

Course Objective: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

Student Learning Outcomes: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Same as the course being substituted with this course.

275. Supervised Problems - One to four semester hours. Individual study and/or laboratory research. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Pass-fail grading. (F, Sp, Sum I, Sum II)

Chemistry 275
Supervised Problems

Course Description: Individual study and/or laboratory research.

Number of Credit Hours: 1 - 4 semester hours

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Pass-Fail grading.

Program Learning Outcomes:
3. The student will perform qualitative/quantitative chemical analyses/syntheses using modern instrumentation.
4. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication. (depending on instructor or project)
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.
6. The student will demonstrate ability to integrate knowledge content, laboratory skill, critical thinking and problem solving, and communication skills via participation in research projects.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The student should demonstrate their ability to conduct chemical research.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
• apply the chemistry knowledge obtained during the college career. (PLO 3, 6)
• analyze experimental results based upon trends in data. (PLO 5)
• practice the safe use/handling of chemicals and their proper storage. (PLO 3)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

276. Supervised Problems - One to four semester hours. Continuation of CHE 275. Individual study and/or laboratory research. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Pass-fail grading. (F, Sp, Sum I, Sum II)

Chemistry 276
Supervised Problems


Course Description: Individual study and/or laboratory research.

Number of Credit Hours: 1 - 4 semester hours

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Pass-Fail grading.

Program Learning Outcomes:
3. The student will perform qualitative/quantitative chemical analyses/syntheses using modern instrumentation.
4. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication. (depending on instructor or project)
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.
6. The student will demonstrate ability to integrate knowledge content, laboratory skill, critical thinking and problem solving, and communication skills via participation in research projects.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The student should demonstrate their ability to conduct chemical research.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
• apply the chemistry knowledge obtained during the college career. (PLO 3, 6)
• analyze experimental results based upon trends in data. (PLO 5)
• practice the safe use/handling of chemicals and their proper storage. (PLO 3)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

302. Fundamental Applications of Chemistry - Four semester hours, three hours lecture, two hours lab per week. Presentation of the applications of chemistry and chemical principles to everyday life with an emphasis on hands-on investigations. May not be used to meet graduation requirements by a student majoring / minoring in the College of Sciences and Mathematics. Prerequisites: CHE 111, CHE 125 or PHY 125 or consent of instructor. Required lab fee. (F, Sum II)

Chemistry 302
Fundamental Applications of Chemistry

Course Description: Presentation of the applications of chemistry and chemical principles to everyday life with an emphasis on hands-on investigations. May not be used to meet graduation requirements by students majoring/minoring in the College of Sciences and Mathematics.

Number of Credit Hours: 4 semester hours - 3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHE 125, PHY 125, or consent of instructor. Required lab fee.

Program Learning Outcomes: There are no specific program learning outcomes for this major addressed in this course. This course is a general education course and a service course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The course objective is to demonstrate to the prospective elementary teacher, the basic concepts and application of chemical principles and show how a teacher may apply these concepts in the elementary classroom, especially by the use of appropriate hands-on exercises.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, the students are expected to
• Recognize the structure of the atom
• Recognize simple nuclear processes
• Recognize ionic and covalent bonding
• Recognize solutions
• Recognize acids and bases
• Recognize gas behavior
• be able to apply the concepts of chemistry in hands-on activities

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Introduction (1-5%)
Matter and Energy (2-10%)
Atomic Structure (2-10%)
Periodic Table (2-10%)
Nuclear Chemistry (2-10%)
Ionic Bonding (2-10%)
Covalent Bonding (2-10%)
Chemical Reactions (2-10%)
Electrochemistry (2-10%)
Solutions (2-10%)
Acids and Bases (2-10%)
Gases (2-10%)
Petroleum (2-10%)
Air Pollution (2-10%)
Water Pollution (2-10%)

320. Chemical Concepts - Review of fundamentals of chemistry as related to teaching. Does not count toward a major or minor in chemistry. Prerequisite: eight hours of chemistry. (offered as needed)

321. Applied Chemical Concepts - Fundamentals of laboratory safety and stockroom management / design. Prerequisite: CHE 231 (offered as needed)

330. Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry - Comprehensive one semester course for students requiring only one semester of organic. Prerequisites: CHE 134, 134L. Corequisite: CHE 330L (Sp, Sum I)

Chemistry 330
Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry

Course Description: Comprehensive one semester course for students requiring only one semester of organic.

Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 134 and 134L. Corequisite: CHE 330L

Program Learning Outcomes: There are no specific program learning outcomes for this major addressed in this course. This course is a general education course and a service course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a core curriculum course.

Course Objective: To provide students with explanations of basic concepts (overview) of organic chemistry.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
• Identify the various organic functional groups present in the structure of an organic molecule.
• Give the correct name of an organic compound when provided the structure of the compound, and give the correct structure of a compound when provided the name.
• Illustrate basic concepts of structure and bonding in organic compounds, including constitutional isomerism, stereoisomerism, conformational analysis, and structural effects on the physical and chemical properties of organic compounds.
• Apply fundamental chemical principles including: thermodynamics, kinetics, and acid-base behavior to explain the chemical behavior and reactivity of organic compounds.
• Illustrate basic concepts relating to reactivity of organic compounds, including: substitution, addition, elimination, oxidation-reduction, free radical reactions and the mechanisms for these reactions.
• Predict the product(s) of an organic reaction(s) consisting of one or several steps, correctly taking into account aspects of stereo-, regio-, and chemoselectivity.
• Formulate a reasonable multi-step synthesis of an organic compound from a specified starting material.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
• Basic structural and bonding principles of organic compounds (2 lectures)
• Physical properties of organic compounds (1 lecture)
• Stereochemistry and chirality in organic compounds (3 lectures)
• Acid-base properties relating to organic compounds (1 lecture)
• Basic principles of organic reaction mechanisms (1 lecture)
• Nucleophilic substitution reactions (1 lecture)
• Elimination reactions (1 lecture)
• Electrophilic addition reactions (1 lecture)
• Free-radical substitution reactions (1 lecture)
• Conformational analysis of acyclic and cyclic organic compounds (1 lecture)
• Basic nomenclature principles of organic chemistry (1 lecture)
• Organic functional groups (1 lecture)
• Structure & bonding in aromatic compounds (1 lecture)
• Chemical reactions of aromatic compounds (2 lectures)
• Structure & properties of carbonyl compounds (1 lecture)
• Nucleophilic addition reactions (1 lectures)
• Enolate formation & aldol-type reactions (1 lecture)
• Structure & properties of carboxylic acids & carboxylic acid derivatives (1 lecture)
• Chemical reactions & syntheses of carboxylic acids & carboxylic acid derivatives (1 lecture)
• Structure & properties of amines (1 lecture)
• Structure, stereochemistry, nomenclature, & properties of carbohydrates (1 lecture)
• Chemical reactions & syntheses of carbohydrates (2 lectures)
• Structure, stereochemistry, nomenclature, & properties of amino acids (2 lectures)
• Applications of organic compounds in environmental contexts (1 lecture)
• Applications of organic compounds in nutritional contexts (1 lecture)

330L. Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry Laboratory - One semester hour, three hours of lab per week. Synthesis and characterization of organic compounds. Prerequisites: CHE 134, 134L. Corequisite: CHE 330. Required lab fee. (Sp, Sum I)

Chemistry 330L
Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry Lab

Course Description: Synthesis and characterization of organic compounds.

Number of Credit Hours: 1 semester hours - 3 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHE 134 and 134L. Co-requisite: CHE 330. Required lab fee.

Program Learning Outcomes: There are no specific program learning outcomes for this major addressed in this course. This course is a general education course and a service course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a core curriculum course.

Course Objective: To provide students with an explanation of the basic concepts of organic chemistry and to apply them to chemistry problems through a laboratory setting. The student will demonstrate basic laboratory techniques and be able to apply them in a practical chemistry setting.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate the fundamental skills and techniques used in organic chemistry laboratory including:
• Laboratory safety and maintaining a laboratory notebook
• Using reference manuals and methods of obtaining information about organic compounds
• Recrystallization
• Simple distillation
• Fractional distillation
• Extraction
• Gas chromatography
• Synthesis
• IR
• NMR

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
• Lab safety & technique (1 period)
• Lab reports & report writing (1 period)
• Lab notebooks & recordkeeping (1 period)
• Introduction to organic lab equipment & techniques (2 periods)
• Performing an organic reaction (1 period)
• Product isolation & purification (1 period)
• Product characterization (melting point & IR spectroscopy) (1 period)
• Acid-base extraction (2 periods)
• Free-radical polymerization (1 period)

331. Organic Chemistry I - Development of organic chemistry for chemistry majors, minors, and pre-health professionals. Prerequisites: CHE 134, 134L. Corequisite: CHE 331L (F, Sum I)

Chemistry 331
Organic Chemistry I

Course Description: Development of organic chemistry for chemistry majors, minors, and pre-professionals.

Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHE 134 and 134L. Corequisite: CHE 331L.

Program Learning Outcomes:
1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: To provide students with explanations of the basic concepts of organic chemistry.


Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
• Identify the various organic functional groups present in the structure of an organic molecule. (PLO 1)
• Give the correct name of an organic compound when provided the structure of the compound, and give the correct structure of a compound when provided the name. (PLO 1)
• Illustrate basic concepts of structure and bonding in organic compounds, including constitutional isomerism, stereoisomerism, conformational analysis, and structural effects on the physical and chemical properties of organic compounds. (PLO 1, 2)
• Apply fundamental chemical principles including: thermodynamics, kinetics, and acid-base behavior to explain the chemical behavior and reactivity of organic compounds. (PLO 1, 2)
• Illustrate basic concepts relating to reactivity of organic compounds, including: substitution, addition, elimination, oxidation-reduction, free radical, and pericyclic reactions and the mechanisms for these reactions. (PLO 1, 2)
• Predict the product(s) of an organic reaction(s) consisting of one or several steps, correctly taking into account aspects of stereo-, regio-, and chemoselectivity. (PLO 1, 2)
• Formulate a reasonable multi-step synthesis of an organic compound from a specified starting material. (PLO 1, 2)
• Analyze spectroscopic data (IR, MS, and 1H-NMR) in order to elucidate the correct structure of a molecule, including being able to assign correctly various spectral attributes and features to a particular portion of a molecule's structure. (PLO 1, 2)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
• Basic structural and bonding principles of organic compounds (3 lectures)
• Physical properties of organic compounds (1 lecture)
• Stereochemistry and chirality in organic compounds (3 lectures)
• Acid-base properties relating to organic compounds (2 lectures)
• Basic principles of organic reaction mechanisms (1 lecture)
• Principles of thermodynamics and kinetics applying to organic compounds (2 lectures)
• Nucleophilic substitution reactions (2 lectures)
• Elimination reactions (2 lectures)
• Electrophilic addition reactions (2 lectures)
• Free-radical substitution reactions (2 lectures)
• Infrared spectroscopy (1 lecture)
• Mass spectrometry (1 lecture)
• Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H & 13C) (3 lectures)
• Organic synthesis and retrosynthetic analysis (2 lectures)
• Conformational analysis of acyclic and cyclic organic compounds (2 lectures)
• Oxidation-reduction reactions in organic compounds (1 lecture)
• Basic nomenclature principles of organic chemistry (1 lecture)
• Organic functional groups (1 lecture)

331L. Organic Chemistry I Laboratory - One semester hour, four hours of lab per week. Synthesis and characterization of organic compounds. Prerequisites: CHE 134, 134L. Corequisite: CHE 331. Required lab fee. (F, Sum I)

Chemistry 331L
Organic Laboratory I

Course Description: Synthesis and characterization of organic compounds.

Number of Credit Hours: 1 semester hour - 4 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHE 134 and 134L. Co-requisite: CHE 331. Required lab fee.

Program Learning Outcomes:
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
3. The student will perform qualitative/quantitative chemical analyses/syntheses using modern instrumentation.
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The principles of organic chemistry in the laboratory will be explained. In the process, students will be exposed to a broad range of techniques and procedures important to the successful practice of experimental organic chemistry, especially the safe handling of chemicals and the proper manipulation of labware and instrumentation. Students will demonstrate how to keep proper laboratory records and apply the basic principles of scientific report writing.

Student Learning Outcomes: By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:
• Follow a published procedure to
o Perform an organic reaction successfully
o Isolate and purify the product of an organic reaction (PLO 3)
• Use library resources and the chemical literature to find information about organic compounds
• Use spectroscopic data to elucidate the molecular structure of an unknown organic compound (PLO 2)
• Write a good laboratory report including
o Recording his/her procedure, data, and observations in the laboratory notebook
o Demonstrating in writing that he/she understood the chemical & physical principles involved in laboratory techniques & manipulations
o Following established principles for communicating laboratory data & results (PLO 5)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
• Lab safety & technique (1 period)
• Lab reports & report writing (1 period)
• Lab notebooks & recordkeeping (1 period)
• Introduction to organic lab equipment & techniques (2 periods)
• Performing an organic reaction (1 period)
• Product isolation & purification (1 period)
• Product characterization (melting point & IR spectroscopy) (1 period)
• Acid-base extraction (2 periods)
• Free-radical polymerization (1 period)

332. Organic Chemistry II - Continuation of CHE 331. Prerequisites: CHE 331, 331L. Corequisite: CHE 332L. (Sp, Sum II)

Chemistry 332
Organic Chemistry II

Course Description: Continuation of CHE 331.

Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHE 331 and 331L. Co-requisite: CHE 332L.

Program Learning Outcomes:
1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: To provide students with explanations of the basic concepts of organic chemistry.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
• Identify the various organic functional groups present in the structure of an organic molecule. (PLO 1)
• Give the correct name of an organic compound when provided the structure of the compound, and give the correct structure of a compound when provided the name. (PLO 1)
• Illustrate basic concepts of structure and bonding in organic compounds, including constitutional isomerism, stereoisomerism, conformational analysis, and structural effects on the physical and chemical properties of organic compounds. (PLO 1, 2)
• Apply fundamental chemical principles including: thermodynamics, kinetics, and acid-base behavior to explain the chemical behavior and reactivity of organic compounds. (PLO 1, 2)
• Illustrate basic concepts relating to reactivity of organic compounds, including: substitution, addition, elimination, oxidation-reduction, free radical, and pericyclic reactions and the mechanisms for these reactions. (PLO 1, 2)
• Predict the product(s) of an organic reaction(s) consisting of one or several steps, correctly taking into account aspects of stereo-, regio-, and chemoselectivity. (PLO 1, 2)
• Formulate a reasonable multi-step synthesis of an organic compound from a specified starting material. (PLO 1, 2)
• Analyze spectroscopic data (IR, MS, and 1H-NMR) in order to elucidate the correct structure of a molecule, including being able to assign correctly various spectral attributes and features to a particular portion of a molecule's structure. (PLO 1, 2)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
• Structure, bonding, & reactivity of non-aromatic conjugated ?-systems (3 lectures)
• Structure & bonding in aromatic compounds (2 lectures)
• Chemical reactions of aromatic compounds (4 lectures)
• Structure & properties of carbonyl compounds (1 lecture)
• Nucleophilic addition reactions (3 lectures)
• Applications of main-group organometallic compounds in organic synthesis (2 lectures)
• Keto-enol tautomerism (1 lecture)
• Enolate formation & aldol-type reactions (3 lectures)
• Structure & properties of carboxylic acids & carboxylic acid derivatives (1 lecture)
• Chemical reactions & syntheses of carboxylic acids & carboxylic acid derivatives (2 lectures)
• Applications of ?-dicarbonyl compounds in organic synthesis (2 lectures)
• Applications of umpolung (polarity reversal) processes in organic synthesis (1 lecture)
• Structure & properties of amines (1 lecture)
• Chemical reactions & syntheses of amines (2 lectures)
• Structure, stereochemistry, nomenclature, & properties of carbohydrates (1 lecture)
• Chemical reactions & syntheses of carbohydrates (2 lectures)
• Structure, stereochemistry, nomenclature, & properties of amino acids (2 lectures)
• Synthesis & characterization of amino acids (2 lectures)

332L. Organic Chemistry II Laboratory - One semester hour, four hours lab per week. Continuation of CHE 331L. Prerequisites: CHE 331, 331L. Corequisite: CHE 332. Required lab fee. (Sp, Sum II)

Chemistry 332L
Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

Course Description: Continuation of 331L.

Number of Credit Hours: 1 semester hour - 4 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHE 331 and 331L. Co-requisite: CHE 332. Required lab fee.

Program Learning Outcomes:
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
3. The student will perform qualitative/quantitative chemical analyses/syntheses using modern instrumentation.
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: This course is a continuation of CHE 331L. Part of the focus of 331L was to demonstrate the techniques and manipulations that are needed for organic lab. This semester, a few new techniques will be demonstrated, but the primary focus will be on the application of these techniques. In the lecture portion of the course, we will continue with the study of various organic functional groups. In the laboratory portion of the course, you will have the opportunity to perform and recognize how these reactions are done in a practical sense. As you will see, many times the challenge in running a reaction is not with carrying out the reaction itself, but rather isolating and purifying the reaction product from the reaction mixture. Additionally, you will have to use your results and your critical-thinking skills in the unknown determination portion of the lab. You will be given a sample of an unknown compound, and your mission will be to determine its identity based on data that you collect in the lab. The semester will culminate with a multi-step synthesis of lidocaine, which will test your laboratory skills and abilities.

Student Learning Outcomes: By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:
• Follow a published procedure to
o Perform an organic reaction successfully
o Isolate and purify the product of an organic reaction (PLO 3)
• Use library resources and the chemical literature to find information about organic compounds
• Use spectroscopic data to elucidate the molecular structure of an unknown organic compound (PLO 2)
• Write a good laboratory report including
o Recording his/her procedure, data, and observations in the laboratory notebook
o Demonstrating in writing that he/she understood the chemical & physical principles involved in laboratory techniques & manipulations
o Following established principles for communicating laboratory data & results (PLO 5)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
• Structure elucidation using multiple spectroscopic techniques (1 period)
• Diels-Alder reaction (2 periods)
• Electrophilic aromatic substitution (3 periods)
• Soap preparation & characterization (2 periods)
• Lidocaine preparation & characterization (3 periods)

337. Physical Chemistry I - Four semester hours, three hours lecture, three hours lab per week. Laws, principles, and theories concerning the structure of matter as related to properties. Prerequisites: CHE 231 and MTH 234. Required lab fee. (F)

Chemistry 337
Physical Chemistry I

Course Description: Laws, principles, and theories concerning the structure of matter as related to properties.

Number of Credit Hours: 4 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHE 231 and MTH 234. Fall. Required lab fee.

Program Learning Outcomes:
1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The basic techniques, tools, and theories from the areas of Thermodynamics and Kinetics will be explained.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, students will:
• Recognize the need for the fields of Thermodynamics and Kinetics.
• Derive and apply the Laws of Thermodynamics. (PLO 1, 2)
• Derive and apply the laws governing the fundamentals of equilibrium. (PLO 1, 2)
• Explain the Kinetic Theory of Gases (PLO 1)
• Derive and apply equations explaining the rate of reactions. (PLO 1, 2)
• Derive mechanisms to explain rate equations. (PLO 1, 2)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics and equations of State (5-15%)
First Law of Thermodynamics (5-15%)
Second Law of Thermodynamics (5-15%)
Fundamental Equations of Thermodynamics (5-15%)
Chemical Equilibrium (5-15%)
Phase Equilibrium (5-15%)
Thermodynamics of Biochemical Reactions (5-15%)
Kinetic Theory of Gases (5-15%)
Experimental Kinetics and Gas Reactions (5-15%)
Chemical Dynamics and Photochemistry (5-15%)
Kinetics in the Liquid Phase (5-15%)
Electrochemical Equilibrium (0-15%)

Chemistry 337L
Physical Chemistry I Lab

Course Description: Laws, principles, and theories concerning the structure of matter as related to properties.

Number of Credit Hours: 0 semester hours - 3 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHE 231 and MTH 234. Fall. Required lab fee.

Program Learning Outcomes:
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
3. The student will perform qualitative/quantitative chemical analyses/syntheses using modern instrumentation.
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The basic techniques, tools, and theories from the areas of Thermodynamics and Kinetics will be explained.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, students will:
• Recognize the need for the fields of Thermodynamics and Kinetics.
• Derive and apply the Laws of Thermodynamics.
• Derive and apply the laws governing the fundamentals of equilibrium.
• Explain the Kinetic Theory of Gases
• Derive and apply equations explaining the rate of reactions.
• Derive mechanisms to explain rate equations.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Gas Thermometry (2 lab periods)
Heat Capacity Ratio of Gases (2 lab periods)
Heats of Combustion (2 lab periods)
Heats of Ionic Reaction (2 lab periods)
Binary Solid-Liquid Phase Diagrams (2 lab periods)
Kinetics (2 lab periods)
Ionization Constants of Acids (2 lab periods)

338. Physical Chemistry II - Four semester hours, three hours lecture, three hours lab per week. Continuation of CHE 337. Prerequisite: CHE 337. Required lab fee. (Sp)

Chemistry 338
Physical Chemistry II

Course Description: Continuation of CHE 337.

Number of Credit Hours: 4 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 337. Required lab fee.

Program Learning Outcomes:
1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The basic techniques and tools used in the area of Quantum Mechanics will be explained. This includes the prediction of behavior of atomic and molecular systems.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course students will:
• Recognize the need for the field of quantum mechanics.
• Derive and understand the three basic models in quantum mechanics. (PLO 1, 2)
• Recognize and apply basic symmetry to molecular systems. (PLO 1, 2)
• Recognize the role of quantum mechanics and symmetry in spectroscopy. (PLO 1)
• Interpret basic spectra utilizing concepts from quantum mechanics and spectroscopy. (PLO 1, 2)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Quantum Theory (5-15%)
Atomic Structure (5-15%)
Molecular Electronic Structure (5-15%)
Symmetry (5-15%)
Rotational and Vibrational Spectroscopy (5-15%)
Electronic Spectroscopy of Molecules (5-15%)
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (5-15%)
Statistical Mechanics (5-15%)

Chemistry 338L
Physical Chemistry II Lab

Course Description: Continuation of CHE 337.

Number of Credit Hours: 0 semester hours - 3 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 337. Required lab fee.

Program Learning Outcomes:
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
3. The student will perform qualitative/quantitative chemical analyses/syntheses using modern instrumentation.
4. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication.
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.
6. The student will demonstrate ability to integrate knowledge content, laboratory skill, critical thinking and problem solving, and communication skills via participation in research projects.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The basic techniques and tools used in the area of Quantum Mechanics will be explained. This includes the prediction of behavior of atomic and molecular systems.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course students will:
• Recognize the need for the field of quantum mechanics.
• Derive and understand the three basic models in quantum mechanics.
• Recognize and apply basic symmetry to molecular systems.
• Recognize the role of quantum mechanics and symmetry in spectroscopy.
• Interpret basic spectra utilizing concepts from quantum mechanics and spectroscopy.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Enzyme Kinetics (3 lab periods)
Absorption Spectrum of a Conjugated Dye (3 lab periods)
Viscometry (3 lab periods)
Excited State Properties of 2-Naphthol (3 lab periods)

420. Environmental Chemistry - Four semester hours, three hours lecture, three hours lab per week. Chemical processes involved in the environment. Prerequisites: CHE 231 and 330 or 331. Required lab fee. (Sp)

Chemistry 420
Environmental Chemistry

Course Description: Chemical processes involved in the environment.

Number of Credit Hours: 4 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 231 and 330 or 331. Required lab fee.

Program Learning Outcomes:
There are no specific program learning outcomes for this major addressed in this course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: This course is designed to develop knowledge of chemistry fundamentals; and the basic principles and concepts of environmental chemistry. The student will develop knowledge of geochemistry, atmospheric chemistry, environmental microbiology, water treatment.

Student Learning Outcomes: This course will introduce students to several problems in Environmental Chemistry, appropriate in the undergraduate curriculum. Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

• Recognize environmental principles, and applications of modern analytical and chemical techniques for measuring and controlling contaminants.
• Recognize fundamental chemistry of environmental assessment, and use of this knowledge in every day situations. (Topics will include equilibrium, oxidation-reduction reactions, kinetics, solubility, acid-base chemistry, and thermodynamics to complex environmental processes).
• Discuss the environment and man's impact upon it.
• Demonstrate analytical chemical methods needed to monitor, control, and study the environment.
• Illustrate statistical methods for establishing adequate criteria for the analytical methods.
• Discuss models describing systems of the environment, and the normal values and trends for environmental contaminants.
• Describe the effect of contaminants on the environment and its inhabitants, including humans.
• Explain important environmental constituents.
• Explain Environmental regulations and their effect on our lives.
• Recognize interrelations between energy, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere/lithosphere, the biosphere, and complex environmental processes.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Introduction (5-15%)
Nuclear Chemistry (5-15%)
Aquatic Chemistry (5-15%)
Pourbaix diagrams (5-15%)
Colloids (5-15%)
Water Pollutants (5-15%)
Organic Chemistry (5-15%)
Pesticides and Herbicides (5-15%)
Microorganisms (5-15%)
Water Treatment (5-15%)
Removal of Heavy Metals (5-15%)
Atmosphere Chemistry (5-15%)
Air Pollution (5-15%)
Soil Chemistry (5-15%)


Chemistry 420L
Environmental Chemistry Lab


Course Description: Chemical processes involved in the environment.

Number of Credit Hours: 0 semester hours - 3 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 231 and 330 or 331. Required lab fee.

Program Learning Outcomes:
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
3. The student will perform qualitative/quantitative chemical analyses/syntheses using modern instrumentation.
4. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication.
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.
6. The student will demonstrate ability to integrate knowledge content, laboratory skill, critical thinking and problem solving, and communication skills via participation in research projects.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: This course is designed to develop knowledge of chemistry fundamentals; and the basic principles and concepts of environmental chemistry. The student will develop knowledge of geochemistry, atmospheric chemistry, environmental microbiology, water treatment.

Student Learning Outcomes: This course will introduce students to several problems in Environmental Chemistry, appropriate in the undergraduate curriculum. Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

• Recognize environmental principles, and applications of modern analytical and chemical techniques for measuring and controlling contaminants.
• Recognize fundamental chemistry of environmental assessment, and use of this knowledge in every day situations. (Topics will include equilibrium, oxidation-reduction reactions, kinetics, solubility, acid-base chemistry, and thermodynamics to complex environmental processes).
• Discuss the environment and man's impact upon it.
• Demonstrate analytical chemical methods needed to monitor, control, and study the environment.
• Illustrate statistical methods for establishing adequate criteria for the analytical methods.
• Discuss models describing systems of the environment, and the normal values and trends for environmental contaminants.
• Describe the effect of contaminants on the environment and its inhabitants, including humans.
• Explain important environmental constituents.
• Explain Environmental regulations and their effect on our lives.
• Recognize interrelations between energy, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere/lithosphere, the biosphere, and complex environmental processes.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Safety (1 lab period)
UV-Vis (1 lab period)
FT-IR (1 lab period)
Cyclic Voltammetry (1 lab period)
Liquid Chromatography (1 lab period)
NMR (1 lab period)
AAS (1 lab period)
Analysis of Water Sample for Metals (1 lab period)
Molecular Modeling (1 lab period)
GC (1 lab period)

441. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry - Reactions and structures of inorganic molecules and ions are studied. Prerequisite: CHE 337. (Sp)

Chemistry 441
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Course Description
: Reactions and structures of inorganic molecules and ions are studied.

Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 337.

Program Learning Outcomes:
1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The objective of this class is to explain theoretical inorganic chemistry and to apply this knowledge to problem solving involving critical thinking. This basic knowledge is to prepare the student for additional coursework, either in chemistry or in other disciplines, and to help the student function in technological society.

Student Learning Outcomes: The student will need to recognize and apply the following basic principles to problem solving:
• The student will need to apply the basic principles of quantum mechanics to determine electron configurations of atoms and ions. (PLO 1, 2)
• The student will need to demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of symmetry and group theory. (PLO 1, 2)
• The student will need to illustrate an understanding of the principles of ionic bonding. (PLO 1, 2)
• The student will need to illustrate an understanding of the principles of covalent bonding. (PLO 1, 2)
• The student will need to demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of periodicity. (PLO 1, 2)
• The student will need to demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of metals. (PLO 1, 2)
• The student will need to demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of metals. (PLO 1, 2)
• The student will need to demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of acid-base chemistry and non-aqueous solvents. (PLO 1, 2)
• The student will need to apply the basic principles of coordination chemistry. (PLO 1, 2)
• The student will need to apply the basic principles of organometallic chemistry. (PLO 1, 2)
• The student will need to demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of the structure determination of inorganic compounds. (PLO 1, 2)
• The student will need to recognize other chemistry of the metals. (PLO 1, 2)
• The student will need to recognize nonmetal chemistry. (PLO 1, 2)
• The student will need to apply the basic principles of bioinorganic chemistry. (PLO 1, 2)

Outline of Topics (approximate number of lectures):
The electronic structures of atoms 1
Symmetry and group theory 1
Ionic bonding 5
Covalent bonding 3
Periodicity 2
Metals 2
Acid-base chemistry and non-aqueous solvents 4
Structure determination 3
Coordination chemistry 8
Organometallic chemistry 6
Other chemistry of the metals 1
Nonmetal chemistry 4
Bioinorganic chemistry 2
Nomenclature 1

*All lecture numbers are ±1.

442L. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory - One semester hour, three hours laboratory per week. The preparation and characterization of inorganic compounds. Prerequisite: CHE 441 or concurrent enrollment. Lab fee required. (Sp)

Chemistry 442L
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

Course Description: The preparation and characterization of inorganic compounds.

Number of Credit Hours: 1 semester hour - 3 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 441 or concurrent enrollment. Lab fee required.

Program Learning Outcomes:
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
3. The student will perform qualitative/quantitative chemical analyses/syntheses using modern instrumentation.
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The objective of this course is to explain some methods for the synthesis and characterization of inorganic materials. This will be done through three experiments. These observations will prepare the student for additional coursework, either in chemistry or in other disciplines, and will help the student function in a technological society. This objective assumes that the student has passed chemistry 133 and 134 (or their equivalents).

Student Learning Outcomes: On completion of this course, the student will be able to:
• Recognize and apply chemistry concepts to problem solving. (PLO 2)
• Recognize and apply quantitative methods to problem solving. (PLO 2)
• Exhibit the ability of problem solving; demonstrate the knowledge of issues facing modern science, and have the confidence and laboratory skills needed to complete routine experiments. (PLO 3
• Demonstrate the knowledge of influence of modern technology on chemistry by using instrumentation to collect data during laboratory experiments. (PLO 5)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Week Lab Assignment

Experiment 1 Synthesis and Characterization of a Solid
1 Do solid-state preparation
2 Do X-ray analysis of sample
3 Determine density and magnetic susceptibility measurements
4 Finish work and prepare report on Experiment 1
Experiment 2 Synthesis and Characterization of a Metallocene
5 Begin metallocene preparation
6 Finish preparation and collect spectral data on metallocene
7 Finish work and prepare report on Experiment 2
Experiment 3 Synthesis, Characterization, and Analysis of an Coordination Compound
8 Prepare oxalate complex
9 Collect spectral data on complex
10 Continue collecting spectral data
11 Begin analysis of sample for the metals present
12 Finish metal analysis and begin oxalate and water determinations
13 Finish oxalate and water determinations
14 Finish work and prepare report on Experiment 3

443. Instrumental Analysis - Four semester hours, three hours lecture, three hours lab per week. Spectrochemical and electrochemical methods of analysis. Prerequisites: CHE 231, 337. Required lab fee. (F)

Chemistry 443
Instrumental Analysis

Course Description: Spectrochemical and electrochemical methods of analysis.

Number of Credit Hours: 4 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 231 and 337. Required lab fee.

Program Learning Outcomes:
1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: To provide students with a more detailed explanation of the basic concepts, laws, and theories and to apply the knowledge to chemistry problem solving. The student will develop an appreciation for chemistry as it relates to the other disciplines. Furthermore, the student will recognize how chemistry provides solutions to contemporary, historical, technological, and societal issues. In addition, students will get experience in operating the following instruments: Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer, Atomic Absorption Spectrometer, Ultraviolet-Visible Spectrophotometer, Liquid Chromatograph, Gas Chromatograph, and Ion Chromatograph. If a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer and a Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer are operational, students will be taught to operate them as well. Students will be taught electrochemical techniques such as polarography, cyclic voltammetry, potentiometry, and chronoamperometry.

Student Learning Outcomes: The student is expected to recognize and apply the fundamental and practical aspects of the following concepts and apply the concepts to problem solving:
• The principles of gas, liquid, ion, and gel permeation chromatography, (PLO 1, 2)
• The principles of UV-visible, infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, Raman, and X-Ray spectroscopy, (PLO 1, 2)
• The concepts involved in atomic absorption spectroscopy, (PLO 1, 2)
• The fundamentals of how flame and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy are applied to analytical chemistry, (PLO 1, 2)
• The concepts used in electron spin resonance spectroscopy, (PLO 1, 2)
• The fundamentals of electrochemistry that relate to half-reactions, Voltaic cells, and electrolytic cells, (PLO 1, 2)
• The fundamentals of electrochemical analysis, including polarography, pulse polarography, voltammetry, potentiometry, coulometry, and amperometry. (PLO 1, 2)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Chromatographic Separations (5-15%)
Gas Chromatography (5-15%)
Liquid Chromatography (5-15%)
Supercritical Fluid Chromatography (5-15%)
Capillary Electrphoresis (5-15%)
Spectrometric Methods (5-15%)
Optical Atomic Spectroscopy (5-15%)
Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (5-15%)
Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (5-15%)
Mass Spectroscopy (5-15%)
X-ray Spectroscopy (5-15%)
Ultraviolet/Visible Spectroscopy (5-15%)
Infrared Spectroscopy (5-15%)
Raman Spectroscopy (5-15%)
NMR (5-15%)
Potentiometry (5-15%)
Voltammetry (5-15%)
Coulometry (5-15%)



Chemistry 443L
Instrumental Analysis Lab

Course Description: Spectrochemical and electrochemical methods of analysis.

Number of Credit Hours: 0 semester hours - 3 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 231 and 337. Required lab fee.

Program Learning Outcomes:
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
3. The student will perform qualitative/quantitative chemical analyses/syntheses using modern instrumentation.
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: Laboratory techniques will be demonstrated that are applied to instrumental analysis of chemical samples and solution chemistry. The basics of statistics related to analytical chemistry will be demonstrated by the students. When possible the analyses will be related to practical problem solving of contemporary, historical, technological, and societal issues.

Student Learning Outcomes: The student is expected to demonstrate and apply the following concepts to problem solving:
• The calculations involved in the preparation of solutions using solid and liquid ¬solutes.
• The basics of preparing standards, calibration curves, and validation of experimental analysis.
• Beer's Law and how it is applied to instrumental analysis, involving atomic absorption spectroscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy.
• Principles of electrogravimetric analysis that involves special sample preparation using fuming solutions with sulfuric acid.
• The students should recognize the basic principles of potentiometry.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Orientation and Safety (1 lab period)
Gas Chromatography (1 lab period)
Liquid Chromatography (1 lab period)
Ion Chromatography (1 lab period)
GCMS (1 lab period)
UV-vis (1 lab period)
AA (1 lab period)
IR (1 lab period)
Electrogravimetric Determination (1 lab period)
Voltammetric Determination (1 lab period)

452. Comprehensive Biochemistry I - Structure, function, and chemical aspects of proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates; enzyme kinetics, mechanism / regulation of enzymes; introduction to metabolism; carbohydrate metabolism. Prerequisites: CHE 330 or 331. (F, Sp)

Chemistry 452
Comprehensive Biochemistry I

Course Description: Structure, function, and chemical aspects of proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates; enzyme kinetics; mechanism/regulation of enzymes; introduction to metabolism; carbohydrate metabolism.

Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 330 or CHE 331.

Program Learning Outcomes:
1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: To gain competency in the major areas of biochemistry which include protein structure/function, protein techniques, nucleic acid structure/function, nucleic acid techniques, enzymes, enzyme kinetics, enzyme mechanisms, membranes, carbohydrate, metabolism.

Student Learning Outcomes: The student is expected to demonstrate and apply the following concepts to biochemistry.

• Recognize vocabulary used in biochemistry especially in relation to proteins, DNA, enzymes, other biological molecules, and metabolism. (PLO 1)
• Applying vocabulary and basic concepts to solving more advance problems in biochemistry. (PLO 1, 2)
• Applying mathematical knowledge in the field of biochemistry which includes buffers, kinetics, energy as well as theoretical background of centrifugation and electrophoresis. (PLO 1, 2)
• Be able to integrate knowledge of other scientific disciplines with the field of biochemistry and be able to communicate this knowledge. (PLO 5)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Introduction (5-15%)
Biomolecules (5-15%)
Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins (5-15%)
Protein Architecture and Biological Function (5-15%)
Enzyme Reactions (5-15%)
Kinetics (5-15%)
Coenzymes (5-15%)
Enzymes Regulation/Mechanism (5-15%)
Abzymes and Ribozymes (5-15%)
Carbohydrates (5-15%)
Lipids (5-15%)
DNA and RNA (5-15%)
Cellular Metabolism (5-15%)
Metabolism of Carbohydrates (5-15%)
Citric Cycle (5-15%)
Phosphogluconate Pathway (5-15%)
ATP (5-15%)

452L. Comprehensive Biochemistry I Laboratory - One semester hour, three hours of lab per week. Purification and characterization of biomolecules. Prerequisites: CHE 330L or 331L and CHE 452 or concurrent enrollment. Required lab fee. (F)

Chemistry 452L
Comprehensive Biochemistry I Laboratory

Course Description: Purification and characterization of biomolecules.

Number of Credit Hours: 1 semester hour - 3 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHE 330L or 331L and CHE 452 or concurrent enrollment. Required lab fee.

Program Learning Outcomes:
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
3. The student will perform qualitative/quantitative chemical analyses/syntheses using modern instrumentation.
4. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication.
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: To gain competency in basic laboratory techniques of biochemistry that are needed for the purification and characterization of biological molecules.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate basic biochemical techniques. The student will have laboratory experience in

• Basic analytical techniques for biochemical applications (pipetting, mass, solution/buffer preparation)
• Theory and application of biochemical techniques with emphasizing on critical thinking and problem solving in a laboratory setting (PLO 2, 3)
• Written and oral communication of literature and laboratory results. (PLO 4, 5)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Introduction/Safety (1 lab period)
Pipetting (1 lab period)
Data Analysis (1 lab period)
Solution and Buffer Preparation (1 lab period)
Protein Purification (1-2 lab periods)
Electrophoresis (1-2 lab period)
Enzyme Kinetics (1-2 lab period)
ELISA (1-2 lab period)
PCR (1-2 lab period)
DNA Purification and Basic Cloning (1-2 lab period)

453. Comprehensive Biochemistry II - Continuation of Comprehensive Biochemistry I; study of the structure, function, chemistry, and metabolism of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids; control of metabolic pathways; interrelationships of metabolic pathways; bioenergetics; current issues relating metabolism to medicine and health. Prerequisite: CHE 452. (Sp)

Chemistry 453
Comprehensive Biochemistry II

Course Description: Continuation of Comprehensive Biochemistry I; study of the structure, function, chemistry, and metabolism of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids; control of metabolic pathways, interrelationships of metabolic pathways; bioenergetics; current issues relating metabolism to medicine and health.

Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 452.

Program Learning Outcomes:
1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The relationship among topics in biochemistry will be explained.

Student Learning Outcomes: The student is expected to demonstrate and apply the following concepts to biochemistry:

• Vocabulary used in biochemistry. (PLO 1)
• Applying vocabulary and basic concepts from Biochemistry I and II to solving advanced problems in biochemistry. (PLO 1, 2)
• Integration of biochemical concepts with information from other courses as well as with information from current biochemical literature. (PLO 1, 2)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Signal Transduction and Sensory Systems (5-25%)
Regulation of Gene Expression (5-25%)
Metabolism of Lipids/Amino Acids/Nucleotides (5-25%)
Integration of Metabolism Energetics of Oxidative Phosphorylation (5-25%)
Current Biochemical Literature (5-25%)

454. Biochemical Techniques - Three semester hours, one hour lecture, six hours lab per week. A capstone course for the biochemistry major that allows the student to obtain practice in biochemical techniques. Prerequisites: CHE 452L and CHE 453 (or concurrent enrollment). Lab fee required. (Sp)

Chemistry 454
Biochemical Techniques

Course Description: A capstone course for the biochemistry major which allows the student to obtain practice in biochemical techniques.

Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 1 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHE 452L and CHE 453 (or concurrent enrollment). Lab fee required.

Program Learning Outcomes:
There are no specific program learning outcomes for this major addressed in this course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective:
• to demonstrate the practical laboratory techniques for the biochemical field
• to explain the theory and background relating to the techniques
• to explain problem solving and analytical thinking, to explain scientific record keeping and communication

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, the student will have
• applied biochemical techniques
• developed problem solving capabilities
• developed scientific communication skills.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Introduction (5-15%)
Safety/Ethics (5-15%)
Restriction Mapping of DNA (5-15%)
DNA Finger Printing (5-15%)
Southern Blot (5-15%)
Plasmid DNA Structure (5-15%)
Molecular Cloning (5-15%)
Genetic Engineering (5-15%)
Polymerase Chain Reaction (5-15%)
ELISA (5-15%)
Enzyme Kinetics (5-15%)

Chemistry 454L
Biochemical Techniques Laboratory

Course Description: A capstone course for the biochemistry major which allows the student to obtain practice in biochemical techniques.

Number of Credit Hours: 0 semester hours - 6 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHE 452L and CHE 453 (or concurrent enrollment). Lab fee required.

Program Learning Outcomes:
2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
3. The student will perform qualitative/quantitative chemical analyses/syntheses using modern instrumentation.
4. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication.
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective:
• to demonstrate the practical laboratory techniques for the biochemical field
• to explain the theory and background relating to the techniques
• to explain problem solving and analytical thinking, to explain scientific record keeping and communication

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, the student will have
• applied biochemical techniques (PLO 3)
• developed problem solving capabilities (PLO 2)
• developed scientific communication skills. (PLO 4, 5)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Introduction/Safety (2 lab periods)
Restriction Mapping (1 lab period)
Molecular Cloning (2 lab periods)
Southern Blot (1 lab period)
ELISA (1 lab period)
Genetic Engineering (2 lab periods)
Enzyme Kinetics (1 lab period)
PCR (2 lab periods)

455. Advanced Organic Chemistry - Continuation of CHE 331-332, emphasizing spectroscopic methods and advanced topics. Prerequisite: CHE 332. (F)

Chemistry 455
Advanced Organic Chemistry

Course Description: Continuation of CHE 331-332, emphasizing spectroscopic methods and advanced topics.

Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 332.

Program Learning Outcomes:
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication. (depending on instructor)

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The students will be explained organic chemistry from a mechanistic point of view and demonstrated how to access organic chemistry literature.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
• Utilize organic chemistry literature. Develop the habit of keeping track of organic chemistry research.
• Explain covalent bonds.
• Explain stereochemistry.
• Analyze reaction mechanisms from thermodynamic and kinetic point of view, focusing on nucleophilic substitution, polar addition and elimination, carbonyl chemistry.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

470. Seminar - One semester hour. Written and oral reports. Individual instruction. May be repeated for a total of four credit hours. Prerequisite: CHE 337 (Sp)

Chemistry 470
Seminar

Course Description: Written and oral reports. Individual instruction. May be repeated for a total of four credit hours.

Number of Credit Hours: 1 semester hour - 1 hour lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 337.

Program Learning Outcomes:
4. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication.
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The purposes of this course are to
• develop critical thinking and reasoning skills
• make you utilize the chemical literature
• develop your written and verbal professional communication skills
• develop the non-chemical "intangible" tools needed for success after college

Student Learning Outcomes: The student is expected to demonstrate and apply the following concepts:
• Read and analyze chemical literature thoughtfully and critically
• Communicate his/her ideas orally and in writing in a clear and concise manner (PLO 4, 5)
• Recognize ethical principles in a scientific context.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course format.

471. Advanced Special Topics - One to four semester hours. Special studies in chemistry. May be repeated once on a different topic. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. (F, Sp, Sum I, Sum II)

Chemistry 471
Advanced Special Topics

Course Description: Special studies in chemistry. May be repeated once on a different topic.

Number of Credit Hours: 1 - 4 semester hours

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Program Learning Outcomes: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

Course Objective: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

Student Learning Outcomes: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Same as the course being substituted with this course.

471L. Advanced Special Topics Lab - One semester hour, three hours laboratory per week. Special studies in chemistry laboratory techniques. May be repeated once on a different topic. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Lab fee required. (F, Sp, Sum I, Sum II)

Chemistry 471L
Advanced Special Topics Lab

Course Description: Special studies in chemistry laboratory techniques. May be repeated once on a different topic.

Number of Credit Hours: 1 semester hours - 3 hours lab per week.

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Required lab fee.

Program Learning Outcomes: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

Course Objective: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

Student Learning Outcomes: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Same as the course being substituted with this course.

475. Advanced Supervised Problems - One to four semester hours. May be repeated for a total of four hours credit. Undergraduate only. Individual study and / or laboratory research. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Pass-fail grading. (F, Sp, Sum I, Sum II)

Chemistry 475
Advanced Supervised Problems


Course Description: Individual study and/or laboratory research.

Number of Credit Hours: 1 - 4 semester hours

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Pass-Fail grading.

Program Learning Outcomes:
3. The student will perform qualitative/quantitative chemical analyses/syntheses using modern instrumentation.
4. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication. (depending on instructor or project)
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.
6. The student will demonstrate ability to integrate knowledge content, laboratory skill, critical thinking and problem solving, and communication skills via participation in research projects.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The student should demonstrate their ability to conduct independent research.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
• apply the chemistry knowledge obtained during the college career. (PLO 3, 6)
• analyze experimental results based upon trends in data. (PLO 5)
• practice the safe use/handling of chemicals and their proper storage. (PLO 3)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

476. Advanced Supervised Problems - One to four semester hours. May be repeated for a total of four hours credit. Undergraduates only. Individual study and / or laboratory research. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Pass-fail grading. (F, Sp, Sum I, Sum II)

Chemistry 476
Advanced Supervised Problems

Course Description: Individual study and/or laboratory research.

Number of Credit Hours: 1 - 4 semester hours

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Pass-Fail grading.

Program Learning Outcomes:
3. The student will perform qualitative/quantitative chemical analyses/syntheses using modern instrumentation.
4. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication. (depending on instructor or project)
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.
6. The student will demonstrate ability to integrate knowledge content, laboratory skill, critical thinking and problem solving, and communication skills via participation in research projects.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The student should demonstrate their ability to conduct independent research.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
• apply the chemistry knowledge obtained during the college career. (PLO 3, 6)
• analyze experimental results based upon trends in data. (PLO 5)
• practice the safe use/handling of chemicals and their proper storage. (PLO 3)

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.


480. Industrial Internship - Practical work in an industrial setting for a minimum of eight weeks under the joint guidance of a practicing chemist and SFA faculty member. May be repeated for credit if content differs. Prerequisite: permission of the department chair and instructor. Pass-fail grading. (F, Sp, Sum I, Sum II)

Chemistry 480
Industrial Internship

Course Description: Practical work in an industrial setting for a minimum of eight weeks under the joint guidance of a practicing chemist and SFA faculty member. May be repeated for credit if content differs.

Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair and instructor. Pass-Fail grading.

Program Learning Outcomes:
3. The student will perform qualitative/quantitative chemical analyses/syntheses using modern instrumentation.
4. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication.
5. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.
6. The student will demonstrate ability to integrate knowledge content, laboratory skill, critical thinking and problem solving, and communication skills via participation in research projects.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The student should demonstrate the practicing chemist's role in an industrial plant setting.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
• work independently, responsibly, and efficiently to solve problems occurring in an industrial plant setting.
• demonstrate clear oral and written communication skills. (PLO 4, 5)
• demonstrate an ability to find and use applicable procedures and chemical methods. (PLO 3)

• demonstrate an ability to connect technical information and laboratory results and to prepare technically sound progress reports. (PLO 6)
• interpret laboratory results and their application to industrial processes.
• apply textbook knowledge to real-world problems.
• demonstrate an ability to work within a group setting and facilitate on-going progress of an industrial site.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

481. Laboratory Internship - Three semester hours, one hour lecture, four hours lab per week. Teaching experience in undergraduate chemistry laboratory, including maintenance, laboratory preparation, grading and assistance of students in laboratory experience under the direct supervision of faculty mentor. May be repeated for credit if content differs. Prerequisite: permission of the department chair and instructor. Pass-fail grading. (F, Sp, Sum I, Sum II)

Chemistry 481
Laboratory Internship

Course Description: Teaching experience in undergraduate chemistry laboratory, including maintenance, laboratory preparation, grading, and assistant of students in laboratory experience under the direct supervision of faculty mentor. May be repeated for credit if content differs.

Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 1 hour lecture and 4 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair and instructor. Pass-Fail grading.

Program Learning Outcomes:
4. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The student should demonstrate the teacher's role in a laboratory setting.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
• work independently, responsibly, and efficiently to solve problems occurring in an laboratory setting.
• demonstrate clear oral and written communication skills. (PLO 4)
• demonstrate an ability to prepare and present laboratory lecture. (PLO 4)
• perform routine laboratory procedures safely and efficiently.
• explain fundamental principles of chemistry to freshman students.
• demonstrate an ability to assess student progress and develop assessment tools.
• demonstrate safety practices regarding laboratory and chemical storage.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):
Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.


Graduate Courses

505. Advanced Chemical Concepts - Particular emphasis on those concepts which are of value in the teaching of all levels of science and chemistry. Prerequisite: CHE 320 or equivalent. (as needed)

506. Topics in Chemical Concepts - The course will examine one or more topics that are currently of interest in teaching chemical concepts. May be repeated under different topics. Prerequisite: CHE 505 or permission of the instructor

511. Advanced Organic Chemistry - Mechanisms and structural considerations of organic reactions are presented. Prerequisite: CHE 338.

Course Syllabus
Chemistry 511- Advanced Organic Chemistry

Course Description: Mechanisms and structural considerations of organic reactions are presented.
Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

Program Learning Outcomes:

  1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
  2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication. (depending on instructor)
  4. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication. (depending on instructor)

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The students will be explained organic chemistry from a mechanistic point of view and demonstrated how to access organic chemistry literature.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

Outline of Topics (approximate course time): Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

516. Topics in Organic Chemistry - Topics may include recent developments in organic synthesis, organometallics, heterocyclics, phase transfer catalysis, and physical organic chemistry. May be repeated under different topics.

Course Syllabus

Chemistry 516 -Topics in Organic Chemistry

Course Description: Topics may include recent developments in organic synthesis, organometallics, heterocyclics, phase transfer catalysis, and physical organic chemistry. May be repeated under different topics. Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

Program Learning Outcomes:

  1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
  2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication. (depending on instructor)
  4. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication. (depending on instructor)

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The relationship among topics in organic chemistry will be explained.

Organic Spectroscopy

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

Advanced Organic Mechanisms

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

Organometallic Chemistry Student

Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

Outline of Topics (approximate course time): Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

521. Advanced Analytical Chemistry - An in-depth study of classical and instrumental methods of analysis commonly encountered in analytical chemistry.

Course Syllabus

Chemistry 521 - Advanced Analytical Chemistry

Course Description: An in-depth study of classical and instrumental methods of analysis commonly encountered in analytical chemistry. Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

Program Learning Outcomes:

  1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
  2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication. (depending on instructor)

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: To provide students with an more detailed explanation of the basic concepts, laws, and theories of chemical separations and to apply the knowledge to chemistry problem solving at an advanced level. The student will develop an appreciation for chemistry as it relates to the other disciplines. Furthermore, the student will recognize how chemistry provides solutions to contemporary, historical, technological, and societal issues.

Student Learning Outcomes: The student is expected to demonstrate and apply the fundamental and practical aspects of the following concepts and apply the concepts to problem solving:

Outline of Topics (approximate course time): Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

526. Topics in Analytical Chemistry - A study of one or more topics currently of interest in analytical chemistry. May be repeated under different topics.

Course Syllabus

Chemistry 526 - Topics in Analytical Chemistry

Course Description: Topics may include recent developments in organic synthesis, organometallics, heterocyclics, phase transfer catalysis, and physical organic chemistry. May be repeated under different topics. Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture Course

Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

Program Learning Outcomes:

  1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
  2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication. (depending on instructor)

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: To provide students with an more detailed explanation of the basic concepts, laws, and theories of electrochemistry and to apply the knowledge to chemistry problem solving at an advanced level. The student will develop an appreciation for chemistry as it relates to the other disciplines. Furthermore, the student will recognize how chemistry provides solutions to contemporary, historical, technological, and societal issues.

Student Learning Outcomes: The student is expected to demonstrate and apply the fundamental and practical aspects of the following concepts and apply the concepts to problem solving:

Outline of Topics (approximate course time): Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

531. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry - An advanced survey of the major principles of inorganic chemistry.

Course Syllabus

Chemistry 531 -Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Course Description: An advanced survey of the major principles of inorganic chemistry. Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

Program Learning Outcomes:

  1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
  2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication. (depending on instructor)

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The objective of this class is to explain theoretical inorganic chemistry and to apply this understanding to problem solving involving critical thinking. This knowledge is to prepare the student for additional coursework, either in chemistry or in other disciplines, and to help the student function in a technological society.

Student Learning Outcomes: The student will need to demonstrate and apply the following basic principles to problem solving:

Outline of Topics (approximate course time): Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

536. Topics in Inorganic Chemistry - Topics of current interest in inorganic chemistry will be treated. May be repeated under different topics.

Course Syllabus

Chemistry 536 -Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Course Description: Topics of current interest in inorganic chemistry will be treated. May be repeated under different topics. Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

Program Learning Outcomes:

  1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
  2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication. (depending on instructor)

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The objective of this class is to explain theoretical inorganic chemistry and to apply this understanding to problem solving involving critical thinking. This knowledge is to prepare the student for additional coursework, either in chemistry or in other disciplines, and to help the student function in a technological society.

Student Learning Outcomes: the student will need to demonstrate and apply the following basic principles to problem solving:

Outline of Topics (approximate course time): Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

541. Advanced Physical Chemistry - A survey of selected principles of physical chemistry at an advanced level.

Course Syllabus

Chemistry 541 - Advanced Physical Chemistry

Course Description: A survey of selected principles of physical chemistry at an advanced level. Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

Program Learning Outcomes:

  1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
  2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: Chemical kinetics is the study of the rates of chemical reaction. This course will be an in-depth study of reaction mechanisms used to explain chemical behavior.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course students will:

Outline of Topics (approximate course time): Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

546. Topics in Physical Chemistry - Advanced topics in physical chemistry to fit needs/interests of students. May be repeated under different topics.

Course Syllabus

Chemistry 546 - Topics in Physical Chemistry

Course Description: Advanced topics in physical chemistry to fit needs/interests of students. May be repeated under different topics. Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture Course

Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

Program Learning Outcomes:

  1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
  2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: Quantum theory enables chemists to explain and predict the behavior of atomic and molecular systems. The basic theory and methods used in quantum mechanics will be explained.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course students will:

Outline of Topics (approximate course time): Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

551. Advanced Biochemistry - In-depth study of the structure and function of DNA replication and repair; transcripyion; regulation of gene expression; genetic manipulation; ethical/medical/health issues relating to genetic manipulation. Prerequisite: CHE 453 a minimum grade of C.

Course Syllabus

Chemistry 551- Advanced Biochemistry

Course Description: In-depth study of the structure and function of DNA replication and repair; transcripyion; regulation of gene expression; genetic manipulation; ethical/medical/health issues relating to genetic manipulation. Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 453 a minimum grade of C.

Program Learning Outcomes:

  1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
  2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication. (depending on instructor)
  4. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication. (depending on instructor)

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The relationship among topics in biochemistry will be explained.

Student Outcome Objectives: The student is expected to demonstrate detailed/advanced understanding of the following topics in biochemistry.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time): Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

555. Proteins and Nucleic Acids - Molecular basis for eukaryotic inheritance; structure and function; chromosomal organization; DNA replication and repair, transcription and translation; the genetic code, regulation of gene expression, genetic differentiation; genetic manipulation. Prerequisites: BIO 341 and CHE 453.

556. Topics in Biochemistry. - Topics covered will relate to current developments and discoveries in the field of biochemistry. May be repeated under a different topic. Prerequisite: CHE 452 with a minimum grade of C.

Course Syllabus

Chemistry 556 - Topics in Biochemistry

Course Description: Topics covered will relate to current developments and discoveries in the field of biochemistry. May be repeated under a different topic. Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture Course

Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 452 with a minimum grade of C.

Program Learning Outcomes:

  1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental content in the basic areas of chemistry: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical.
  2. The student will integrate knowledge with critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication. (depending on instructor)
  4. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication. (depending on instructor)

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The relationship among topics in biochemistry will be explained.

Student Outcome Objectives: The student is expected to demonstrate detailed/advanced understanding of the following topics in biochemistry.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time): Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

570. Seminar - 1 semester hour. Student will present to the faculty their research proposals or a literature based presentation prior to their third term.

Course Syllabus

Chemistry 570 Seminar

Course Description: Students will present to the faculty their research proposals or a literature based presentation prior to their third term. Number of Credit Hours: 1 semester hour - 1 hour lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

Program Learning Outcomes:

  1. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication.
  2. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The purposes of this course are to:

Student Learning Outcomes: The student is expected to demonstrate and apply the following concepts:

Outline of Topics (approximate course time): Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course format.

571. Advanced Special Topics - Special studies in chemistry. May be repeated under a different topic.

Course Syllabus

Chemistry 571 - Advanced Special Topics

Course Description: Special studies in chemistry. May be repeated once on a different topic. Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Program Learning Outcomes: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

Course Objective: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

Student Learning Outcomes: Same as the course being substituted with this course.

Outline of Topics (approximate course time): Same as the course being substituted with this course.

572. Advanced Environmental Chemistry I - Chemical processes involved in the environment. Prerequisite: CHE 231 and 330 or 331.

Course Syllabus

Chemistry 572 - Advanced Environmental Chemistry

Course Description: Chemical processes involved in the environment. Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 3 hours lecture

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 231 and 330 or 331.

Program Learning Outcomes: The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication. (depending on instructor) The student will articulate scientific information through written communication. (depending on instructor)

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: This course is designed to develop knowledge of chemistry fundamentals; and the basic principles and concepts of environmental chemistry. The student will develop knowledge of geochemistry, atmospheric chemistry, environmental microbiology, water treatment.

Student Learning Outcomes: This course will introduce students to several problems in Environmental Chemistry, appropriate in the graduate curriculum. Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

Outline of Topics (approximate course time):

Introduction (5-15%)

Nuclear Chemistry (5-15%)

Aquatic Chemistry (5-15%)

Pourbaix diagrams (5-15%)

Colloids (5-15%)

Water Pollutants (5-15%)

Organic Chemistry (5-15%)

Pesticides and Herbicides (5-15%)

Microorganisms (5-15%)

Water Treatment (5-15%)

Removal of Heavy Metals (5-15%)

Atmosphere Chemistry (5-15%)

Air Pollution (5-15%)

Soil Chemistry (5-15%)

575. Advanced Graduate Studies - one - three semester hours, three hours lab per week required for each semester hour of credit. Special problems in chemistry. Individual instruction. Prerequisite: Four semesters of chemistry or equivalent. Lab fee required.

Course Syllabus

Chemistry 575 - Advanced Graduate Studies

Course Description: Special problems in chemistry. Individual instruction. Number of Credit Hours: 1-3 semester hours- 3 hours lab per week required for each semester hour of credit.

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Four semesters of chemistry or equivalent.

Program Learning Outcomes:

  1. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication. (depending on instructor or project)
  2. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.
  3. The student will demonstrate ability to integrate knowledge content, laboratory skill, critical thinking and problem solving, and communication skills via participation in research projects.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The student should demonstrate the ability to conduct independent research at the M.S. level.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

Outline of Topics (approximate course time): Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

576. Advanced Graduate Studies - one - three semester hours. A continuation of CHE 575. Prerequisite: CHE 575. Lab fee required.

Course Syllabus

Chemistry 576 - Advanced Graduate Studies

Course Description: Special problems in chemistry. Individual instruction. Number of Credit Hours: 1-3 semester hours- 3 hours lab per week required for each semester hour of credit.

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Four semesters of chemistry or equivalent.

Program Learning Outcomes:

  1. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication. (depending on instructor or project)
  2. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.
  3. The student will demonstrate ability to integrate knowledge content, laboratory skill, critical thinking and problem solving, and communication skills via participation in research projects.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The student should demonstrate the ability to conduct independent research at the M.S. level.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

Outline of Topics (approximate course time): Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

581. Supervised Instruction of Laboratory Courses - Teaching experience in undergraduate chemistry laboratory including maintenance, laboratory preparation, grading, and assistant of students in laboratory under the direct supervision of faculty mentor. Required of all graduate assistants for one semester. Pass-Fail grading.

Course Syllabus

Chemistry 581 - Supervised Instruction of Laboratory Courses

Course Description: Teaching experience in undergraduate chemistry laboratory including maintenance, laboratory preparation, grading, and assistant of students in laboratory under the direct supervision of faculty mentor. Required of all graduate assistants for one semester Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours - 1 hour lecture and 4 hours lab per week

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair and instructor. Pass-Fail grading.

Program Learning Outcomes: The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The student should demonstrate the teacher's role in a laboratory setting.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

Outline of Topics (approximate course time): Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

589. Thesis Research - Research for the thesis. Individual research under the direction of graduate faculty member. Prerequisite: CHE 338.

Course Syllabus

Chemistry 589 Thesis Research

Course Description: Research for the thesis. Individual research under the direction of graduate faculty member. Number of Credit Hours: 3 semester hours

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

Program Learning Outcomes:

  1. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication.
  2. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.
  3. The student will demonstrate ability to integrate knowledge content, laboratory skill, critical thinking and problem solving, and communication skills via participation in research projects.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The student should demonstrate the ability to conduct independent research at the M.S. level.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

Outline of Topics (approximate course time): Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.

590. Thesis Writing - Three, six or nine semester hours. Organization and writing of thesis based on graduate research. Prerequisite: CHE 589.

Course Syllabus

Chemistry 590 Thesis Writing

Course Description: Organization and writing of thesis based on graduate research. Number of Credit Hours: 3, 6 or 9 semester hours.

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHE 589.

Program Learning Outcomes:

  1. The student will articulate scientific information through oral communication.
  2. The student will articulate scientific information through written communication.
  3. The student will demonstrate ability to integrate knowledge content, laboratory skill, critical thinking and problem solving, and communication skills via participation in research projects.

General Education Core Curriculum Objectives: There are no specific general education core curriculum objectives in this course. This course is not a general education core curriculum course.

Course Objective: The purpose of this course is to prepare students to conduct independent research after college.

Student Learning Outcomes:

Outline of Topics (approximate course time): Variable: dependent on instructor and selected course content.