Stephen F. Austin State University

Bachelor of Business Administration

group of students

For more information on the Bachelor of Business Administration degree, please see the BBA General Bulletin.

For specific course syllabi, please visit Course Information.

Accounting

OBJECTIVES

The overall objective of the school is to provide academic programs that enable students to prepare for entry into the profession of accountancy. The curriculum is under continual review to ensure that it is responsive to the changing requirements of the accounting profession. In addition, the school provides support courses for non-accounting majors.

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

The Accounting Club is sponsored by the Gerald W. Schlief School of Accountancy and is open to all students. The organization should be of particular interest to students who desire to become acquainted with the accounting profession, accounting professionals and students with similar interests.

Membership in Beta Alpha Psi, the Accounting Honor Society, is for selected juniors, seniors and graduate students who maintain specified scholastic standards and meet specified professional and community service hour requirements. Students who want to be considered for this honor should consult the Epsilon Mu Chapter adviser or a student officer.

DEFINITION OF MAJORS

The school offers three outstanding and comprehensive programs. The accounting degree programs cover concepts of financial accounting, managerial accounting, information systems for accounting and management, tax, and auditing. These subjects make up the core of the accounting curriculum. Depending upon the degree program, other course options include not-for-profit/governmental, oil and gas, international, or managerial accounting. The three degree programs offered are:

B.B.A./M.P.A.: SFA's five-year program leads to a Master of Professional Accountancy degree for those who are primarily interested in pursuing a career in public accounting. The program contains 156 hours of course credit and was designed to meet the changing needs of the profession. It complies with all the educational requirements for those who wish to take the CPA exam. Abachelor's degree is awarded simultaneously with the M.P.A.

M.P.A.: SFA's stand-alone M.P.A. has a 36 semester hour core. The program is designed for those students holding a baccalaureate degree who wish to obtain a master's degree in accounting and meet the educational requirements to take the CPA exam.

B.B.A.: SFA's four-year B.B.A. accounting program is available for those who are primarily interested in careers in non-public accounting. This program alone does not provide all of the educational requirements for those interested in sitting for the CPA exam.

Four-Year Program

Accounting majors should meet the requirements for a Bachelor of Business Administration degree as outlined in this bulletin. Amajor in accounting consists of ACC 331, 332, 333, 343, 437, 442, 453, 457, 465 and CSC 340.

DEFINITION OF MINOR

A minor in accounting consists of ACC 231, 232, 331 and 332, plus six hours of advanced accounting, excluding ACC 465. At least nine hours (six of which must be advanced) must be completed at SFA. Total 18 hours with at least a 2.0 GPA.

FOUR-YEAR DEGREE PROGRAM:

Bachelor of Business Administration (120 hours)

Accounting Four-Year BBA Suggested Course Outline

Students should consult with an advisor before registering.

Five-year degree program:

Bachelor of Business Administration Master of Professional Accountancy Program

Accounting Five-Year BBA/MPA Suggested Course Outline

Students should consult with an advisor before registering

* M.P.A./B.B.A. degree consists of 120 hours undergraduate and 36 hours graduate.

** A student must apply for admission and be admitted to the graduate school no later than the semester prior to the first semester of enrolling in any 500-level course.

Prior to enrolling in any 500-level course, a student must have been admitted to the graduate school.

To receive clear admission to graduate school a student must meet one of the two requirements:

1- 3.5 or higher overall undergraduate GPA (including all transfer work) with no GMAT score required.

OR

2- Overall undergraduate GPA x 200 +GMAT score = 950 or higher.

*NOTE: Minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.5 or higher is required.

Students are advised to take the GMAT no later than early in their first semester senior year.

For additional information please contact the Gerald Schlief School of Accountancy in McGee, Suite 292, or call their office at 936.468.3105.

COURSES IN ACCOUNTING (ACC)

For a complete listing of Accounting undergraduate courses see General Bulletin

Business Economics

OBJECTIVES

The Department of Economics and Finance provides modern training in economic and financial theory and practice to prepare students for a successful career in business, industry or government. Graduates with a degree in business economics or finance are prepared for a wide variety of challenging and rewarding positions in such fields as banking, investments, corporate financial management, insurance, real estate, financial planning, economic research and market analysis. A degree in economics also provides a very solid foundation for further graduate study, especially in law or public affairs.

DEFINITION OF MAJORS AND MINORS

Bachelor of Business Administration: Business Economics Major

A major in business economics for a B.B.A. candidate consists of all the degree requirements for the B.B.A. listed earlier in this bulletin (which includes ECO 231, 232 and 339) plus ECO 331, 351, 353 and 12 hours of advanced economics electives. Total 21 hours with at least a 2.0 GPA in all economic courses. At least 12 advanced hours must be completed at SFA.

Business Economics Minor

A minor in economics for a B.B.A. candidate consists of ECO 231, 232 and 339 (all of which are already included in the B.B.A. degree requirements), 351 or 353, and six hours of advanced economics electives. Total 18 hours (only nine additional hours) with at least a 2.0 GPA. At least nine hours (six of which must be advanced) must be completed at SFA.

A minor in economics for a non-B.B.A. candidate consists of ECO 231, 232, 351 or 353, and nine hours of advanced economics electives. Total 18 hours with at least a 2.0 GPA. At least nine hours (six of which must be advanced) must be completed at SFA.

Bachelor of Business Administration

Business Economics BBA Suggested Course Outline

Note: See the Degree Requirements in the College of Business for a complete listing of B.B.A. degree requirements and also see the Notes at the end of the introductory section for the College of Business.

COURSE CREDIT

Unless otherwise indicated, each course carries three semester hours credit and three hours lecture per week.

COURSES IN ECONOMICS (ECO)

For a complete listing of courses in Business Economics see General Bulletin.

Computer Information Systems

OBJECTIVES

The Nelson Rusche College of Business offers the BBA degree in Computer Information Systems in cooperaton with the College of Sciences and Mathematics, through its Department of Computer Science. The curriculum provides a broad business education with specific courses in computer information systems and more general courses in information technology and computer science. The computer information systems curriculum focuses on the use of the computer to process information and help solve problems in an ever-changing business envirnment.

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS PROGRAM ACCREDITATION

The Bachelor of Business Administration degree with a major in computer information systems is accredited by AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business

DEFINITION OF MAJOR

Bachelor of Business Administration - Computer Information Systems Major

General Requirements

Students must satisfy requirements for the Bachelor of Business Administration degree with a major in computer information systems as listed in the College of Business section of this bulletin.

Computer Information Systems Major Requirements (34 hours)

  1. CSC 102, 202, 211, 214, 241 (15 hours)
  2. CSC 321, 323 (6 hours)
  3. CSC 411 (one hour), 426 (4 hours)
  4. Nine advanced hours of computer science (9 hours)
    (excluding CSC 340, 350, 351, 353, 355, 385, 412, 452,and 455)
DEFINITION OF MINOR

Computer Information Systems Minor Requirements (21 hours)

  1. CSC 102, 202, 211 (9 hours)
  2. Twelve semester hours from the following with at least six hours being advanced: CSC 214, 241, and all three-hour advanced computer science courses [12 hours (excluding CSC 351, 353, 355, 385, 411, 412, 452, and 455)]

At least 12 hours of computer science (six of which must be advanced) must be completed at SFA.

Must maintain a 2.0 GPAin minor courses completed at SFA, in advanced computer science courses at SFAand in computer science transfer courses.

Other Computer Users

  1. CSC 101 - Introduction to Computing
  2. CSC 121 - Introduction to Information Processing Systems
  3. CSC 340 - Application Software for Microcomputers
  4. CSC 350 - Internet Technologies
  5. CSC 351 - Internet Programming Concepts
  6. CSC 353 - System Administration
  7. CSC 355 - Network Administration
  8. CSC 452 - Database Application Development
  9. CSC 455 - Enterprise Security
Bachelor of Business Administration Degree with a Major in Computer Information Systems

Computer Information Systems Suggested Course Outline

Core & Remaining Requirements

  1. Three hours from: ART 280, 281, 282; DAN 140, 341; MHL 245; MUS 140; THR 161, 370
  2. Three hours from: ENG 200-233H; HIS 151, 152; PHI 153, 223
  3. HIS 133, 134
  4. PSC 141, 142
  5. MKT 351
  6. MGT 463
  7. CSC 411 (one hour), 426
  8. Six advanced hours of computer science (restricted)
  9. Elective hours as required

Minimum of 28 hours needed to complete the degree program in the senior year.

No student may enroll in any business course numbered 300 or higher unless 60 hours of course work will have been completed by the end of the semester for which the student is enrolling.

At that time the following courses should have been completed:

COURSES IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (CSC)

For a complete listing of courses in Computer Science see General Bulletin.

NOTICE FOR COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS MAJORS

The BBA degree in Computer Information Systems is only available for current majors who can fulfill all graduation requirements by August 2017.

Students majoring in Computer Information Systems are advised by faculty in the Department of Computer Science. For more information, please visit their offices in the McGee Building, Suite 303, or call 936.468.2508. Graduation and other degree-related questions should be directed to the Rusche College Office of Student Services in the McGee Building, Suite 169, or by calling 936.468.4654.

Finance

OBJECTIVES

The Department of Economics and Finance provides modern training in economic and financial theory and practice to prepare students for a successful career in business, industry or government. Graduates with a degree in business economics or finance are prepared for a wide variety of challenging and rewarding positions in such fields as banking, investments, corporate financial management, insurance, real estate, financial planning, economic research and market analysis. Adegree in economics also provides a very solid foundation for further graduate study, especially in law or public affairs.

DEFINITION OF MAJORS AND MINORS

Bachelor of Business Administration: Finance Major

A major in finance for a B.B.A. candidate consists of all the degree requirements for the B.B.A. listed earlier in this bulletin (which includes FIN 333) plus FIN 357, 370, 373 and 18 hours from the following: three to six hours from FIN 401, ACC 331, 332, 333, 343; and 12 to 15 hours from ECO 331, FIN 358, 361, 369, 401 (if not taken above), 410, 415, 433, 448, 458, 471, 474, 475 and 490. Not more than six hours may be counted from ECO 331, FIN 361, 369. Total 27 hours; must have at least a 2.0 GPA across all 27 hours plus FIN 333. At least 12 advanced hours must be completed at SFA.

AREAS OF EMPHASIS for B.B.A. in FINANCE

Students majoring in finance who are interested in an emphasis in financial planning should choose the following courses: FIN 357, 361, 369, 370, 373, 415, 448; ACC 343; and three hours from FIN 358, 401, 410, 433, 458, 471, 474, 475 and 490. Students majoring in finance who are interested in an emphasis in banking and financial services should choose the following courses: FIN 357, 361, 370, 373, 401; ECO 331; six hours from ACC 331, 343; FIN 448, 471 and 490; and three hours from FIN 358, 410, 433, 458, 474 and 475 (as well as any of those elective courses not taken above, including ACC 332 and 333, with an overall maximum of six hours in ACC). Students majoring in finance who are interested in an emphasis in investment management should choose the following courses: FIN 357, 370, 373, 401, 410, 458; six hours from ACC 343, FIN 358, 433 and 490; and three hours from ECO 331, FIN 361, 369, 448, 471, 474 and 475 (as well as any of those elective courses not taken above, including ACC 331, 332, 333).

FINANCE MINOR

A minor in finance for a B.B.A. candidate consists of FIN 333 (already included in the B.B.A. degree requirements), 357, 370, 373 and six hours from FIN 358, 401, 410, 415, 433, 458, 471, 474, 475 and 490. Total 18 hours (only 15 additional hours) with at least a 2.0 GPA. At least nine hours (six of which must be advanced) must be completed at SFA. A minor in finance for a non-B.B.A. candidate consists of ACC 231, FIN 333, 357, 370 and six hours from FIN 358, 373, 401, 410, 415, 433, 458, 471, 474, 475 and 490. Total 18 hours with at least a 2.0 GPA. At least nine hours (six of which must be advanced) must be completed at SFA. A minor in financial planning for a B.B.A. candidate consists of FIN 357, 361, 369, 415, 448 and ACC 343. Atotal of 18 hours with at least a 2.0 GPA. At least nine hours must be completed at SFA. A minor in financial planning for a non-B.B.A. candidate consists of ACC 231, 232, 343 and FIN 333, 357, 361, 369, 415, 448. A total of 27 hours with at least a 2.0 GPA. At least 15 hours must be completed at SFA.

Bachelor of Business Administration

Finance BBA Suggested Course Outline

Note: See the Degree Requirements in the College of Business section of the General Bulletin for a complete listing of B.B.A. degree requirements and also see the Notes at the end of the introductory section for the College of Business.

COURSES IN FINANCE (FIN)

For a complete listing of courses in Finance see General Bulletin.

General Business

OBJECTIVES

The general business major is ideally suited for students who know exactly what career paths they plan to pursue after graduation and who wish to select courses that directly apply to that specific career. This major also allows students to obtain a broad-based B.B.A. degree without emphasizing any one of the functional areas of business.

DEFINITION OF MAJOR

In addition to the foundation courses that are required for the Bachelor of Business Administration degree, the major in general business consists of:

  1. Six hours selected from ECO 331; FIN 357, 361; GBU 321; and MGT 373
  2. Six hours representing two of the following areas:
    • Law: BLW 366, 437, 456, 468 and 478
    • Communication: BCM 347, 447 and 450
    • Technology: GBU 310, 440, 461 and CSC 340
  3. Nine advanced hours within the College of Business.
AREAS OF EMPHASIS

Students interested in a corporate communication emphasis should choose the following courses in their general business major: BCM 347, 447 and 450; GBU 321; MGT 373; three hours from GBU 310, 440, 461 or CSC 340; and three hours from BLW 456 or GBU 345 or 485.

Students interested in a legal studies emphasis should choose the following courses in their general business major: nine hours from BLW 366, 437, 456, 468, 478 or GBU 400; six hours from ECO 331, FIN 357 or 361, GBU 321, or MGT 373; three hours from ACC 343, ECO 345, GBU 485, MGT 379 or MKT 425 or 357; and three hours from BCM 450 or GBU 440.

DEFINITION OF MINORS

To further meet the specialized needs of students, the department offers minors in administrative law, business communication, general business and general business technology applications. At least nine hours of any minor (six of which must be advanced) must be completed at SFA.

A minor in administrative law consists of BLW 335, 437 and PBA 300; six semester hours selected from BLW 456, 468 and 478; and three semester hours selected from PSC 301, 302, 403, 447, 448 or CJS 305. Total 18 hours with at least a 2.0 GPA.

A minor in business communication consists of BCM 247, 347, 447, 450 and six semester hours selected from the following courses: COM 170, 380; MKT 352, 353; and ENG 273, 473. Total 18 hours with at least a 2.0 GPA.

A minor in general business consists of ACC 101 or 231; GBU 147 or FIN 369; BCM 247 or BLW 330; ECO 231; and nine advanced hours from the College of Business with no more than six advanced hours from any one of the following areas: accounting, business communication, business law, computer science, economics, finance, general business, management and marketing. No more than three hours from BLW 330 and BLW 335 will apply to the general business minor. Total 21 hours with at least a 2.0 GPA. Students earning the B.B.A. degree are not eligible to earn the general business minor.

A minor in general business technology applications consists of BCM 347; GBU 310, 321, 440, 461; and six hours from CSC 102, 202, 211, 340, 350. Total 21 hours with at least a 2.0 GPA.

PETROLEUM LAND MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE

The courses required for the Petroleum Land Management Certificate are ACC 101 or 231, BLW 366 and 468, and GBU 400 and 485. General business majors who wish to earn the PLM Certificate may select the required courses as part of their major and complete the certificate without taking any additional coursework. GOL 131 and 132 are suggested as the required science courses and suggested electives include GOL 350, FOR 223 and GIS 224. Students pursuing the general business minor can concurrently earn the PLM Certificate by taking one additional course: suggested electives include those previously mentioned as well as FIN 333 and GBU 440. Astudent who has previously earned a bachelor's degree in any field may take the required courses and earn the PLM certificate.

TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS

Students who obtain a Bachelor of Business Administration degree and also complete the courses that are necessary to teach business education in the secondary schools of Texas have a certain amount of flexibility in job choice. The business teaching certification requires the B.B.A. foundation courses and a general business major incorporating the following courses: GBU 310, 321, 440; BCM 447; and BLW 437.

The technology applications certification requirements can also be met through the general business major. The requirement for this certification includes the B.B.A. foundation courses plus the following courses: BCM 347; CSC 340; and GBU 310, 321, 440, 461, 475.

These programs also require that students complete the professional development courses that are specified by the College of Education for teaching certification. (See the College of Education section of the General Bulletin).

Bachelor of Business Administration

Business Administration BBA Suggested Course Outline

* Aminimum of 120 hours is required for graduation.

** For undecided business majors, GBU 147 is recommended as an elective.

*** See information at the beginning of the College of Business section of the General Bulletin regarding eligibility for upper-level business courses.

COURSE CREDIT

Unless otherwise indicated, courses are three semester hours credit. Enrollment in courses numbered 300 or higher requires junior standing.

COURSES IN BUSINESS COMMUNICATION (BCM), BUSINESS LAW (BLW), GENERAL BUSINESS (GBU)

For a complete listing of courses in Business Communication, Business Law, and/or General Business see

General Bulletin.

International Business

OBJECTIVES

International Business Curriculum

The international business major provides students with a broad-based business management education with an international perspective, focusing on a general understanding of the economic, political, historical, geographical and cultural factors that affect international business opportunities, strategies, policies and practices. The interdisciplinary curriculum is designed to cover the international business environment so that its effects on business opportunities and problems are clearly understood. The international business major prepares students for a variety of entry-level positions with business and government. Students find career opportunities with business firms involved with international trade or with controlling interests in foreign production and marketing facilities. Various governmental agencies - state, national and international - also offer numerous career opportunities for the major.

Electronic Business Curriculum

"Electronic business" (e-business) is the term commonly used to describe the use of the Internet and other digital technology for conducting business, including advertising, organizational communication, control/coordination, training, management, etc. E-business activities involving buying and selling goods or services often are referred to as "electronic commerce" (e-commerce). The electronic business minor provides preparation for the student who desires to be actively engaged in the e-business operations of a firm, including being knowledgeable about e-business technology and how it relates to management strategies and issues. Students completing the electronic business minor can find positions in all types of public and private organizations, including "virtual" companies that conduct essentially all of their business by electronic means.

Sales Curriculum

The emphasis and minor in sales within the marketing major provide students with the concepts, tools and practices used in the professional fields of personal selling and sales management. Students learn how to create and present sales presentations and how to manage a field sales force, including hiring, training and motivating a sales force. The sales minor provides preparation for a career in personal selling and sales management. Personal selling and sales management are some of the largest and most financially rewarding careers available to college graduates.

Entrepreneurship Curriculum

Entrepreneurship may be defined as the "pursuit of opportunity" and is often manifested in either a new business startup or a value-creating expansion within an ongoing enterprise. This entrepreneurial spirit is universal and is impervious to age, gender or social/economic background. It has been the engine of job creation, innovation and the creation of new industries within the United States for decades. To fully understand the risks and rewards of an entrepreneurial endeavor, students in this discipline learn how to evaluate the degree to which an idea is an opportunity. The dynamics, paradoxes, myths and critical aspects surrounding this process also are studied.

The minor in entrepreneurship provides students with a basis of knowledge that will improve their understanding of entrepreneurial processes. The major in management with an emphasis in small business management/entrepreneurship provides similar preparation but with a stronger emphasis on building general management skills and critical thinking processes.

Most degree programs prepare students for success in given disciplines. In contrast, students completing the entrepreneurship minor or the management major with small business management/entrepreneurship emphasis are prepared to evaluate an idea, structure a top management team and marshal resources in the pursuit of opportunity.

Sports Marketing Curriculum

The minor in sports marketing and the emphasis in sports marketing within the marketing major provide students with an overview of marketing concepts, theories and practices in relation to the sports industry. Specific coverage of sports marketing topics is included along with general marketing concepts that are of use to sports marketers. The program also covers business and marketing strategies in the context of sports, the growing emphasis on the globalization of sports marketing, current research in sports marketing and ethical issues in sports marketing.

Students completing the sports marketing minor or the emphasis in sports marketing within the marketing major can find sports-related jobs in marketing, entrepreneurship, administration, representation and media.

DEFINITIONS OF MAJORS AND MINORS

International Business Major

Students seeking a major in international business must qualify for a Bachelor of Business Administration degree. In addition to the core curriculum, business field of study and business foundation requirements, the student must complete the following three sets of requirements:

Part A - Foundation Courses for the Major: GEO 230; MGT 422 and 472; MKT 452; PSC 332; and three hours from ECO 480, FIN 358 or FIN 433.

Part B - Specialized Region/Country Courses and Cultural and General International Topics: a total of six hours selected from GEO 310, 365, 450; HIS 303, 312, 313, 320, 321, 328, 332, 333, 342, 352, 412, 416; LAS 300, 315, 450; PSC 304, 338, 441; ANT 231; BLW 437; HMS 230, 403 or SPA 320.

Part C - Language Requirement: three hours of college credit in a foreign language (a spoken and written language other than English) at a level equal to or higher than SPA 232/235, FRE 232/235 or GER 232. ASpecial Problems course (ACC 475, ECO 475, FIN 475, GBU 475, MGT 475, MKT 475, etc.) or internship course (ACC 485, ECO 485, FIN 485, GBU 485, MGT 476, MKT 486, etc.) may be counted toward part B of the international business major if the course is "international" in nature (conducted at least partly overseas or at least partly dealing with international business) and is approved by the chair, Department of Management, Marketing and International Business. Texas students who have completed the B.B.A. field of study at another Texas institution are not required to complete GEO 230 but are encouraged to do so. Total 27 hours with a minimum 2.0 GPA. At least 12 hours of advanced coursework in the major must be completed at SFA.

International Business Minor

Students seeking a minor in international business must complete MGT 422; MKT 452; three hours from ECO 480, FIN 358, or FIN 433; three hours from PSC 304, 338, 332, or 441; and six to eight hours of college credit in the same foreign language (must be a spoken and written language other than English). Students with a major in management or marketing will substitute an approved elective for MGT 422 or MKT 452, as applicable. Total 18-20 hours with a minimum 2.0 GPA. At least nine hours (six of which must be advanced) must be completed at SFA.

Electronic Business Minor

The electronic business (e-business) minor is available to any student who meets the course prerequisites. The minor consists of MGT 370 and 472, MKT 351 and 425, CSC 340 and 350, and GBU 461. Total 21 hours with a minimum 2.0 GPA. At least nine hours must be completed at SFA.

Entrepreneurship Minor

For students pursuing a Bachelor of Business Administration degree, a minor in entrepreneurship consists of: MGT 370, MGT 371, MGT 463, MKT 351 and nine additional advanced semester hours in management, including at least six hours from MGT 390, MGT 464, MGT 466 or MGT 485. Total 21 hours with a minimum 2.0 GPA. At least nine hours must be completed at SFA. For non-B.B.A. students, a minor in entrepreneurship consists of: MGT 370; MKT 351; ACC 231 or ACC 101; and nine additional advanced semester hours in management, including at least six hours from MGT 390, MGT 464, MGT 466 or MGT 485. Total 18 hours with a minimum 2.0 GPA. At least nine hours (six of which must be advanced) must be completed at SFA.

Bachelor of Business Administration

International Business BBA Suggested Course Outline

COURSE CREDIT

Unless otherwise indicated, each course carries three-semester hours credit and three hours lecture per week.

COURSES IN MANAGEMENT (MGT) and MARKETING (MKT)

For a complete listing of courses in International Business see General Bulletin.

Management

OBJECTIVES

Management Curriculum

The management major is designed for students interested in developing an understanding of the nature and capabilities of human and physical resources. The study and understanding of management principles and practices will aid those who intend to enter the field professionally as administrators, executives, operations managers, human resource managers, management consultants, proprietor managers, purchasing managers or in other management positions. Students graduating with a management major are employed by a variety of organizations in industries such as manufacturing, public utilities, oil and transportation, merchandising and banking, as well as government and non-profit entities. Asound background in accepted management principles can accelerate progress to positions of greater responsibility.

Electronic Business Curriculum

"Electronic business" (e-business) is the term commonly used to describe the use of the Internet and other digital technology for conducting business, including advertising, organizational communication, control/coordination, training, management, etc. E-business activities involving buying and selling goods or services often are referred to as "electronic commerce" (e-commerce). The electronic business minor provides preparation for the student who desires to be actively engaged in the e-business operations of a firm, including being knowledgeable about e-business technology and how it relates to management strategies and issues.

Students completing the electronic business minor can find positions in all types of public and private organizations, including "virtual" companies that conduct essentially all of their business by electronic means.

Sales Curriculum

The emphasis and minor in sales within the marketing major provide students with the concepts, tools and practices used in the professional fields of personal selling and sales management. Students learn how to create and present sales presentations and how to manage a field sales force, including hiring, training and motivating a sales force. The sales minor provides preparation for a career in personal selling and sales management. Personal selling and sales management are some of the largest and most financially rewarding careers available to college graduates.

Entrepreneurship Curriculum

Entrepreneurship may be defined as the "pursuit of opportunity" and is often manifested in either a new business startup or a value-creating expansion within an ongoing enterprise. This entrepreneurial spirit is universal and is impervious to age, gender or social/economic background. It has been the engine of job creation, innovation and the creation of new industries within the United States for decades. To fully understand the risks and rewards of an entrepreneurial endeavor, students in this discipline learn how to evaluate the degree to which an idea is an opportunity. The dynamics, paradoxes, myths and critical aspects surrounding this process also are studied.

The minor in entrepreneurship provides students with a basis of knowledge that will improve their understanding of entrepreneurial processes. The major in management with an emphasis in small business management/entrepreneurship provides similar preparation but with a stronger emphasis on building general management skills and critical thinking processes.

Most degree programs prepare students for success in given disciplines. In contrast, students completing the entrepreneurship minor or the management major with small business management/entrepreneurship emphasis are prepared to evaluate an idea, structure a top management team and marshal resources in the pursuit of opportunity.

Sports Marketing Curriculum

The minor in sports marketing and the emphasis in sports marketing within the marketing major provide students with an overview of marketing concepts, theories and practices in relation to the sports industry. Specific coverage of sports marketing topics is included along with general marketing concepts that are of use to sports marketers. The program also covers business and marketing strategies in the context of sports, the growing emphasis on the globalization of sports marketing, current research in sports marketing and ethical issues in sports marketing.

Students completing the sports marketing minor or the emphasis in sports marketing within the marketing major can find sports-related jobs in marketing, entrepreneurship, administration, representation and media.

DEFINITIONS OF MAJORS AND MINORS

Management Major

Students seeking a major in management must qualify for a Bachelor of Business Administration degree. In addition to the core curriculum, business field of study and business foundation requirements for the Bachelor of Business Administration degree, the student must complete MGT 422 and 472; three to six hours from MGT 380, MKT 455, SOC 378 or ACC 333; and nine to 12 additional advanced semester hours in management (neither MGT 395 nor 477 may count toward this requirement). Total 21 to 22 hours with a minimum 2.0 GPAin all courses in the major, including MGT 370, 371 and 463. At least 12 hours of advanced coursework in the major must be completed at SFA.*

Students interested in human resource management should complete MGT 373, 379, 422, 472, 484; three hours from MGT 380, MKT 455, SOC 378 or ACC 333; and three additional advanced semester hours in management (neither MGT 395 nor 477 may count toward this requirement).

Students interested in operations management should complete MGT 380, 422, 472; ACC 333; and nine hours from MGT 372, 379, 383 or 471.

Students interested in small business management/entrepreneurship should complete MGT 422, 472; three hours from MGT 380, MKT 455 or SOC 378; six to nine hours from MGT 390, 464, 466 or 485; and three to six hours of additional advanced semester hours in management (neither MGT 395 nor 477 may count toward this requirement). Students are encouraged to complete Internship in Management (MGT 476) or a Special Problems in Management course (MGT 475) in entrepreneurship/small business as part of the elective portion of this emphasis.

Management Minor

For a student pursuing a Bachelor of Business Administration degree, a minor in management consists of MGT 370, 371, 463 and nine additional advanced semester hours in management. Students outside the College of Business who desire a minor in management should take MGT 370 and 15 additional advanced semester hours in management. MGT 395 and 477 may not count toward a minor in management. Total 18 hours with a minimum 2.0 GPA. At least nine hours must be completed at SFA.

Electronic Business Minor

The electronic business (e-business) minor is available to any student who meets the course prerequisites. The minor consists of MGT 370 and 472, MKT 351 and 425, CSC 340 and 350, and GBU 461. Total 21 hours with a minimum 2.0 GPA. At least nine hours must be completed at SFA.

Entrepreneurship Minor

For students pursuing a Bachelor of Business Administration degree, a minor in entrepreneurship consists of: MGT 370, MGT 371, MGT 463, MKT 351 and nine additional advanced semester hours in management, including at least six hours from MGT 390, MGT 464, MGT 466 or MGT 485. Total 21 hours with a minimum 2.0 GPA. At least nine hours must be completed at SFA.

For non-B.B.A. students, a minor in entrepreneurship consists of: MGT 370; MKT 351; ACC 231 or ACC 101; and nine additional advanced semester hours in management, including at least six hours from MGT 390, MGT 464, MGT 466 or MGT 485. Total 18 hours with a minimum 2.0 GPA. At least nine hours (six of which must be advanced) must be completed at SFA.

Bachelor of Business Administration (120 hours)

Management BBA Suggested Course Outline

COURSE CREDIT

Unless otherwise indicated, each course carries three-semester hours credit and three hours lecture per week.

COURSES IN MANAGEMENT (MGT)

For a complete listing of courses in Management see General Bulletin.

Marketing

OBJECTIVES

Marketing Curriculum

The marketing major enables students to understand the activities that are essential to promoting products and services, as well as developing and distributing them to the ultimate consumers. Marketing courses stress problem solving and decision making, as well as the development and implementation of marketing policies and strategies.

Students completing the program find exciting, action-oriented careers in fields such as personal selling, retailing, advertising, product development, manufacturing, distribution and market research.

Electronic Business Curriculum

"Electronic business" (e-business) is the term commonly used to describe the use of the Internet and other digital technology for conducting business, including advertising, organizational communication, control/coordination, training, management, etc. E-business activities involving buying and selling goods or services often are referred to as "electronic commerce" (e-commerce). The electronic business minor provides preparation for the student who desires to be actively engaged in the e-business operations of a firm, including being knowledgeable about e-business technology and how it relates to management strategies and issues.

Students completing the electronic business minor can find positions in all types of public and private organizations, including "virtual" companies that conduct essentially all of their business by electronic means.

Sales Curriculum

The emphasis and minor in sales within the marketing major provide students with the concepts, tools and practices used in the professional fields of personal selling and sales management. Students learn how to create and present sales presentations and how to manage a field sales force, including hiring, training and motivating a sales force. The sales minor provides preparation for a career in personal selling and sales management. Personal selling and sales management are some of the largest and most financially rewarding careers available to college graduates.

Entrepreneurship Curriculum

Entrepreneurship may be defined as the "pursuit of opportunity" and is often manifested in either a new business startup or a value-creating expansion within an ongoing enterprise. This entrepreneurial spirit is universal and is impervious to age, gender or social/economic background. It has been the engine of job creation, innovation and the creation of new industries within the United States for decades. To fully understand the risks and rewards of an entrepreneurial endeavor, students in this discipline learn how to evaluate the degree to which an idea is an opportunity. The dynamics, paradoxes, myths and critical aspects surrounding this process also are studied.

The minor in entrepreneurship provides students with a basis of knowledge that will improve their understanding of entrepreneurial processes. The major in management with an emphasis in small business management/entrepreneurship provides similar preparation but with a stronger emphasis on building general management skills and critical thinking processes.

Most degree programs prepare students for success in given disciplines. In contrast, students completing the entrepreneurship minor or the management major with small business management/entrepreneurship emphasis are prepared to evaluate an idea, structure a top management team and marshal resources in the pursuit of opportunity.

Sports Marketing Curriculum

The minor in sports marketing and the emphasis in sports marketing within the marketing major provide students with an overview of marketing concepts, theories and practices in relation to the sports industry. Specific coverage of sports marketing topics is included along with general marketing concepts that are of use to sports marketers. The program also covers business and marketing strategies in the context of sports, the growing emphasis on the globalization of sports marketing, current research in sports marketing and ethical issues in sports marketing.

Students completing the sports marketing minor or the emphasis in sports marketing within the marketing major can find sports-related jobs in marketing, entrepreneurship, administration, representation and media.

DEFINITIONS OF MAJORS AND MINORS

Marketing

Students seeking a major in marketing must qualify for a Bachelor of Business Administration degree. In addition to the core curriculum, business field of study and business foundation, a major in marketing consists of MKT 355, 425, 452, 455, 457 and nine additional advanced semester hours in marketing. (MGT 383 may be used for three of the nine elective hours.) Total 24 hours with a minimum 2.0 GPAin marketing courses, including MKT 351 and a grade of C or higher in MKT 351.

At least 12 hours of advanced coursework in the major must be completed at SFA.*

Students interested in marketing promotion should complete MKT 352, 353, 355, 425, 452, 455, 457, and three elective hours from MKT 360 or 362.

Students interested in sports marketing should complete MKT 355, 358, 362, 425, 452, 455, 457, and three hours in a sports marketing special problems course (MKT 475) or in a sports marketing internship (MKT 486).

Students interested in business-to-business marketing should complete MKT 355, 425, 452, 454, 455, 457, and six hours from MKT 353, 475, 486 or 383.

Students interested in sales should complete MKT 353, 355, 425, 452, 455, 456, 457, and three hours from MKT 354, 454, 475 or 486.

Marketing Minor

A minor in marketing consists of MKT 351 and 15 hours of other marketing courses numbered 300 and higher (MGT 383 may not count toward the marketing minor). Total 18 hours with a minimum 2.0 GPA and a grade of C or higher in MKT 351. At least nine hours must be completed at SFA.

Sales Minor

A minor in sales consists of MKT 351, 353, 456 and nine additional hours of other courses taken from the following: MKT 355, 358, 360, 425, 454; MGT 383 or either MKT 475 or MKT 486. Total 18 hours with a minimum 2.0 GPA, and a grade of C or higher in MKT 351. At least nine hours must be completed at SFA.

Sports Marketing Minor

Students seeking a minor in sports marketing must complete MKT 351, 352, 358 and 362; three hours in a sports marketing special problems course (MKT 475) or in a sports marketing internship (MKT 486); and ECO 359. Students must take 18 hours with a minimum 2.0 GPA and a grade of C or higher in MKT 351. At least nine hours must be completed at SFA.

*See degree requirements near the beginning of the College of Business section for core curriculum, business field of study, business foundation and other requirements.

Electronic Business Minor

The electronic business (e-business) minor is available to any student who meets the course prerequisites. The minor consists of MGT 370 and 472, MKT 351 and 425, CSC 340 and 350, and GBU 461. Total 21 hours with a minimum 2.0 GPA. At least nine hours must be completed at SFA.

Entrepreneurship Minor

For students pursuing a Bachelor of Business Administration degree, a minor in entrepreneurship consists of: MGT 370, MGT 371, MGT 463, MKT 351 and nine additional advanced semester hours in management, including at least six hours from MGT 390, MGT 464, MGT 466 or MGT 485. Total 21 hours with a minimum 2.0 GPA. At least nine hours must be completed at SFA.

For non-B.B.A. students, a minor in entrepreneurship consists of: MGT 370; MKT 351; ACC 231 or ACC 101; and nine additional advanced semester hours in management, including at least six hours from MGT 390, MGT 464, MGT 466 or MGT 485. Total 18 hours with a minimum 2.0 GPA. At least nine hours (six of which must be advanced) must be completed at SFA.

Bachelor of Business Administration (120 hours)

Marketing BBA Suggested Course Outline

COURSES IN MARKETING (MKT)

For a complete listing of Marketing courses see General Bulletin.