Campus Alert

Outdoor siren and Jack Alert test Wednesday. Click here for more information

Stephen F. Austin State University

Courses

Course

Title

Description

099

Developmental English

Course in critical thinking, reading, and writing, for students who have not yet passed the writing component of the Texas Success Initiative. Will not satisfy freshman English requirements or apply toward an English major or minor requirements. Will not count toward any degree requirement, including elective credit. Does count as part of student's course load for the semester.

131

Rhetoric & Composition

Study and application of the writing process and the skills of writing with a focus on analytical reading and writing. Essay assignments address rhetorical analysis and evaluation and critical responses to close readings of texts. Required of all students who do not qualify for English 133H or 235H. Prerequisite: Pass or exemption from THEA or a C in English 099. Must earn a grade of C or higher to be admitted to English 132.

132

Research & Argument

Continued study and application of the writing process and the skills of writing with a focus on the forms of argumentative writing and on research methods, such as gathering, evaluating, summarizing, synthesizing, and citing source information. Prerequisite: C in English 131. Must earn a C or higher to be admitted to any English 200 level course.

200

Introduction to Literature

Readings in literary genres, such as poetry, drama, short story, novel. Prerequisite: six hours of freshman English

211

World Literature to 1650

Survey in the first half of Western and non-Western literatures spanning the periods from the first written literature through 1650.
Prerequisite: six semester hours of freshman English

212

World Literature from 1650

Survey in the second half of Western and non-Western literatures spanning the periods from 1650 to the present.
Prerequisite: six semester hours of freshman English

220

Readings in British Literature

Periods, genres, authors, themes in British literature. May include special topics. Prerequisite: six hours of freshman English.

221

British Literature to 1800

Survey of majors authors and literary movements/paradigms in British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the eighteenth century.
Prerequisite: six semester hours of freshman English

222

British Literature from 1800

Survey of major authors and literary movements/paradigms in British literature from Romanticism to the present, including study of the Victorians and Moderns.
Prerequisite: six semester hours of freshman English

229

American Literature to 1865

Survey of major authors and literary movements/paradigms in American literature from its beginnings to 1865.
Prerequisite: six semester hours of freshman English

230

American Literature from 1865

Survey of major authors and literary movements/paradigms in American literature from 1865 to the present.
Prerequisite: six semester hours of freshman English

240

Classical Roots of English Vocabulary

Systematic study of Latin and Greek elements in the English language to help students improve general vocabulary and reading comprehension and prepare for graduate/professional school entrance exams. No knowledge of Greek or Latin required. May not be used to satisfy the foreign language requirement.

246

Introduction to Narrative Film

An introduction to the concepts and terminology necessary to discuss and write about narrative film in complex and compelling ways; emphasis on film literacy; the language and grammar of film; critically reading and analyzing the cinematic text.

250 Literature for Young Children In-depth examination of literature for very young children (ages 2-8). Sections of this course may focus on multicultural and global literature for young children.

261

Introduction to Creative Writing

An introduction to the writing of poetry, fiction and non-fiction with opportunities for practice and peer workshop.

273

Technical and Scientific Writing

The study of the rhetorical principles involved in technical and scientific workplace writing, with an emphasis on the production of professional documents, such as analytical reports. Will not satisfy literature requirement; will not count toward an English major or minor (except for a minor in writing).

276

Survey of African-American Literature

Survey of all major genres in African-American literature. An introductory course in African-American literature.

300

Mythology

Study of Greek, Roman, and Hebraic mythology, emphasizing the role of myth in history, culture, and consciousness.
Prerequisite: six semester hours of English

301

Sacred Texts and Traditions

Introduction to the study of religion and to a variety of the world's religious traditions, chiefly by close study of sacred texts. Religions to be studied include Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Besides examining the scriptures, worldviews, and tenets of these religions, an additional, constant goal of the course is developing an awareness of the tools used in religious studies.

302

Folklore

Examines the traditional knowledge of a culture, including the customs, traditions, beliefs, superstitions, oral histories, legends, crafts, foods, art, ceremonies, and speech of a particular group. The focus may be on American folk traditions or those of various societies such as Native Americans or ancient cultures.
Prerequisite: six semester hours of English

304

Ancient/Classical World Literature

A close study of works in world literature (western and non-western) from the earliest writings to approximately 500 CE. The course will cover literature of the ancient near east, classical Greek and Latin literature, Chinese and Indian literature, and early Christian literature. Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English

305

Medieval/Renaissance World Literature

A close study of works in world literature (western and non-western) from approximately 500 to 1600. The course will cover Arabic literature, medieval and Renaissance Romance literature, and Golden Age Japanese literature.
Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English

307

Early Modern/Modern World Literature

A close study of works in world literature (primarily western) from approximately 1600 to 1900. The course will cover French neoclassical literature, continental Romantic literature, and realist and symbolist literature.
Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English

308

Contemporary World Literature

A close study of works in world literature (western and non-western) from 1900 to the present. The course will cover works representative of modernism, postmodernism, magical realism, and contemporary trends.
Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English

315

Medieval British Literature

A close study of British literature from early Celtic and Anglo-Saxon texts through the fifteenth century. The course will cover a variety of genres/modes, such as Arthurian romance, heroic poetry, satire, dream vision, drama, lyrics, chronicle, biography, and autobiography, as well as major authors, such as Marie de France, Chaucer, Langland, the Pearl-Poet, and Malory.
Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English

316

Renaissance British Literature

A close study of British literature in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The course will cover literary schools of the period and major authors, such as Sidney, Spenser, Wyatt, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Bacon, and Milton.
Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English

317

Restoration & 18th-Century British Literature

A close study of British literature from the 1660-1800. The course will cover literary schools of the period and major authors, such as Dryden, Behn, Congreve, Wycherly, Defoe, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Burney, and Thompson.
Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English

318

Romantic & Victorian British Literature

A close study of British literature from the 1780s to 1901. The course will cover literary schools of the period and major authors, such as Wordsworth, Keats, Byron, Radcliffe, Austen, Scott, Tennyson, Rossetti, Arnold, Eliot, and Dickens.
Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English

319

Modern & Contemporary British Literature

A close study of 20th-Century British Literature. The course will cover literary schools of the period and major authors, such as Yeats, T.S. Eliot, Conrad, Woolf, Joyce, Orwell, Dylan Thomas, Burgess, Auden, and Heaney.
Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English

324

Film Movements & Themes

Explorations into the theoretical and historical circumstances surrounding the development of trends and themes within narrative film. Movements and themes may include the French, new wave, German expressionism, neo-realism, film noir, Soviet montage, Hong Kong thrillers, new British cinema, the natural world, religion, masculinity and feminism, gender, race, crime and punishment and love and sexuality. May be repeated when topic changes. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

326

Shakespeare

In-depth study of the poetry and plays of Williams Shakespeare.
Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English

330

Colonial American Literature

A close study of American literature from pre-colonization to the early 1800s. The course will cover literary schools of the period and major authors, such as Smith, Bradford, Bradstreet, Rowlandson, Crevecoeur, Wheatley, Paine, Franklin, Jefferson, Knight, and Equiano. Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English

331

American Romantic/Transcendental Literature

A close study of American literature from the early 1800s through the Civil War. The course will cover literary schools of the period and major authors, such as Cooper, Irving, Emerson, Thoreau, Dickinson, Fuller, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Douglass, and Whitman.
Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English

332

Realism/Naturalism American Literature

A close study of American literature from the end of the Civil War to the 1920s. The course will cover literary schools of the period and major authors, such as Twain, James, Norris, Chesnutt, Crane, London, Dreiser, Chopin, Wharton, and Gilman.
Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English

333

Modern American Literature

A close study of American literature from 1914 to 1945. The course will cover literary schools of the period and major authors, such as Frost, Williams, Stevens, H.D., Faulkner, Porter, Hemingway, Dos Passos, and Fitzgerald.
Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English

334

Contemporary American Literature

A close study of American literature from 1945 to the present. The course will cover literary schools of the period and major authors, such as Salinger, Vonnegut, Ellison, Carver, Ginsberg, O'Connor, Morrison, Barth, and Williams.
Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English

335

Digital Rhetoric and Writing

Study of and practice in writing electronic genres with consideration of audience, media and technology. The course will focus on issues specific to language, visual rhetoric, composition and publication in digital environments.

341 Introduction to Linguistics

*Used to be ENG 441.
Introduction to the core concepts of linguistic study, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics, and to the application of those concepts, such as language acquisition, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and language change. Analyses of linguistic concepts and applications focus on data from languages spoken around the world (i.e., will not focus on or be limited to English).
Prerequisites: None

342

History of the English Language

Study of language change and reasons for change in the English language over the three major periods: Old, Middle, and Modern English. Types of linguistic changes include sound, structure, and meaning; investigation of possible causes for these changes focus on literary developments and socio-political factors that influenced the language. Within Modern English, examination of current English dialects around the world.

344

Structures of English

Linguistic study of English, including phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. Includes an examination of several applied topics, focusing on topics such as English stylistics, language acquisition as it pertains to structures English, English dialects, and history of English.

346

Film Topics: Genre and Auteur

Inensive study of developments in film categorization, classification and interpretation. Studies of genres such as the western, screwball comedy, film noir, musicals, horror, thrillers. Individual directors studied may include Hitchcock, Welles, Hawks, Ford, Sayles, Lee, Spielberg, Kubrick, Coen, Chaplin, Keaton, Cukor and Sirk. May be repeated when topic changes. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

348

Study Abroad

An upper-level topics course for students participating in a study-abroad program with the English Department. Topics will vary.

350

Children's Literature

Study of the major genres of children's literature. Focus on primary texts from each genre. Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English.

351 Fairytales Introduction to the most familiar fairytales. Students will examine just how fairy tales are used in modern work, particularly young adult fiction. Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English. Writing Intensive.
352 Special Topics Course will focus on specific periods, genres, and modes of Children's and Young Adult Literature. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Children's Literature minors may only take course once for credit towards the minor. Prerequisite: 9 semester hours of English.
353 Golden Age of Children's Lit Examination of works for children written by authors in Great Britain and the United States during "The Golden Age of Children's Literature" from 1860-1920. Course examines texts aesthetically, culturally, and historically, discussing how they address the tensions of the age. Course required of those minoring in Children's Literature.
354 Picture Books Study of a genre of children's literature in which words and pictures are used to convey meaning. Course required of those minoring in Children's Literature. Students will study picture book theory, art theory, illustrative theory, and present close-readings of children's picture books.
355 Gender & Sexuality in CHLT Students will assess concepts of masculinity, femininity, sexuality, and socialization in texts aimed at children and adolescents, why certain books are labeled "girls" or "boys" books and the cultural ramifications of such gendered readings. Counts toward the Children's Literature Minor and a general elective.

356

Young Adult Literature

Study of the major genres of literature published for a young adult audience. Focus on primary texts from each genre.
Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English

358 Writing Fiction for Young Adults Designed to introduce writers to the crafting of works for pre-adolescent and adolescent readers. Prerequisite: 9 semester hours of English. Writing Intensive

359

Intermediate Poetry Workshop

Readings and discussions demonstrating the basic structural and technical elements of poetry with opportunities for practice and peer workshop. Prerequisite: ENG 261 or consent of instructor.

361

Intermediate Fiction Workshop

Readings and discussion demonstrating the basic structural and technical elements of fiction with opportunities for practice and peer workshop. Prerequisite: ENG 261 or consent of instructor.

362

Intermediate Non-fiction Workshop

Readings and discussion demonstrating the basic structural and technical elements of creative non-fiction with opportunities for practice and peer workshop. Prerequisite: ENG 261 or consent of instructor.

365

Adaptation: Literature and Film

Investigation of many of the current theories of adaptation. Students will learn the terminology necessary to discuss film and literature, will analyze literary and filmic texts and will grapple with several current strands of sophisticated (and sometimes difficult) film and narrative theory. May be repeated when topic changes. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

370

Ethnic Studies

Introduction to the theory, topics, and methodology of ethnic studies. Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English.

372

Latin American Literature

Introduction to a particular region, national literature, period, or movement in Latin American literature. Topics may vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English.

373 Technical & Professional Editing Study and application of the principles involved in the editing and publication of professional and technical projects. Emphasis placed on planning, arranging, editing, and laying out complex documents like journal issues, scholarly anthologies, and lengthy technical documents. Prerequisite: Six hours of freshman English and at least three additional hours of a sophomore or higher level writing course.

374

Rap Music as Poetry

Study of writers, movements, genres in African-American literature. May be repeated up to nine hours. May be taught as a survey. Prerequisite: nine semester hours of literature.

376

The Harlem Renaissance

Study of major authors of the harlem renaissance period. Genres of literature will include poetry, short story, narrative, letter, play and novel.

377

African-American Literature of the Civil Rights Era

Close reading and intensive study of works by civil rights authors and activists. Readings include, but are not limited to, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Huey Newton, George Jackson, Angela Davis, Eldridge Cleaver and Elaine Brown.

378

African-American Cinema

Analysis of visual representations of African-Americans. Study of connections between textual representations of black faces in early, modern and post-modern fiction. Course traces the development of black cinema as a separate entity in the early 20th century.

379

Literature of Africa

Intensive study of oral and written literature in the African diaspora. Sections will focus on such African literary traditions as storytelling done by Griots.

381

Writing About Literature

Reading and writing critical analyses of primary texts including essays, fiction, and poetry. The course, which reviews the mechanics and techniques of literary analysis, should be taken during the first semester a student is eligible for 300-level courses.
Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English

382

Reasoning and Writing

Construction of argumentative critical analysis based on instructor- and student-selected topics. Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English.

383 The Bible as Literature

This course approaches the Bible as a composite text of multiple genres (mythical, historical, epistolary, poetic, prophetic). Issues include the development of a canon, parameters of interpretation, biblical poetics, and biblical influence. Some comparison with related non-biblical texts.

386

Literary Theory

Introduction to the tradition of theoretical writings about literature and poetics.

390

Special Topics in Literature

Various topics, such as humor and satire, mystery and imagination, science fiction, politics and literature. May be repeated up to six hours. Prerequisite: nine semester hours of English.

405

Topics in Comparative World Literature

Advanced study and research in World literature, which may focus on particular periods, genres, and/or authors.
Prerequisite: twelve semester hours of English

412

Topics in British Literature

Advanced study and research in British literature, which may focus on particular periods, genres, and/or authors.
Prerequisite: twelve semester hours of English

421

Topics in American Literature

Advanced study and research in American literature, which may focus on particular periods, genres, and/or authors.
Prerequisite: twelve semester hours of English

423

Topics in Southwestern American Literature

Advanced study of the literature of Texas and the southwestern United States. The focus may be specifically on Texas authors or works, Southwestern or Southern writers, the Western as a genre, Native American literature, or other related topics. May be repeated when topic changes.

424

Advanced Topics: World Cinema

Investigations of nation and identity in film approached in their specific cultural, historical and theoretical terms. Study of international film movements, individual directors and/or comparison between national cinemas. May be repeated when topic changes. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

426

Genres, Topics, & Authors

Advanced study and research of a particular genre, special topic, or selection of authors, focusing on selections from any combination of authors and texts from American, British and/or World literature. Topics will vary by semester.
Prerequisite: twelve semester hours of English

438 Forensic Linguistics

Linguistic study of texts and recordings to determine authorship, evasion strategies, possible coercion in writings/recordings, stylistic changes, deception, and so on. Linguistic tools include phonetic analysis, structural analysis, and word choice. Texts analyzed include hate mail, suicide letters, ransom notes, and confessions; recordings include interviews, interrogations, and confessions.

439 Advanced Grammar

Advanced investigation of the concepts of grammatical form and function, including the application of labels such as noun, adjective, verb, subject, object, phrase, clause. Study will also include discussion of the use of grammar in written and spoken language, the teaching of grammar in classrooms, the debates about grammatical change in current language, and the notion of standard language.

440 Advanced Linguistic Theory

Focused study on one of the following three subareas of linguistics: phonetics/phonology, morphosyntax, or semantics/pragmatics. Examination of available competing theories within the subarea, and theoretical application to linguistic data. Subareas will be offered on a rotating schedule; students can take this course up to two times (under differing topics).

442

Topics in Linguistics

Advanced study of a topic within linguistics; topics will rotate. Example topics include sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, language and literature, corpus linguistics, historical linguistics, typology and universals, and history of linguistic study. Students may repeat the course under different topics.

444

Teaching English in Secondary School

Theory and practice of language arts pedagogy in grades 8-12. Required for students planning to take English Language Arts and Reading 8-12 TExES (Texas Examination of Educator Standards).
Prerequisites: 24 hours of ENG courses; SED 370, 371, 372; and consent of instructor.

446

Advanced Topics in Film Theory

Concentration on film theory either as general overview or focus on certain aspects, such as auteur, genre, realism/formalism, postmodernist, Marxist, feminist, spectatorship, etc. Prerequisites: Six hours of 300-level film courses or consent of instructor.

448

Women Writers

Close study of American, British, and/or World literatures by women writers. This upper-level course may be arranged according to literary period, genre, theme, and/or selected writers. Prerequisite: twelve semester hours of English

449

Gender and Literature

Introduction to gender as a critical tool for literary study. Topics will vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: ENG 381 and 9 semester hours of English.

459

Advanced Poetry Workshop

Classroom analysis and discussion of student writing. Prerequisites: Twelve hours of English including ENG 261 and ENG 359 or graduate standing or consent of instructor. May be repeated for up to six hours.

460 Literary Publishing Intership Students will have the opportunity to intern at REAL, the literary journal of SFA, to participate in all facets of a magazine's operation, from the daily routine of screening manuscripts and recording subscriptions through issue preparation. The intnership places classroom writing workshops into skills acquisition, enabling students to carry real editing experience into graduate studies or into careers in professional writing or publishing.

461

Advanced Fiction Workshop

Classroom analysis and discussion of student writing. Prerequisite: Twelve semester hours of English, including ENG 261 and 361 or graduate standing or consent of instructor. May be repeated for up to six hours.

462

Advanced Non-fiction Workshop

Classroom a nalysis and discussion of student writing. Prerequisites: Twelve hours of English including ENG 261 and 362 or graduate standing or consent of instructor. May be repeated for up to six hours.

463

Elements of Craft

Analysis of selected examples (either prose or poetry) with emphasis on technical, generic and aesthetic features. Prerequisites: Twelve hours of English including ENG 261, 359, 361, 362. May be repeated with change of topic.

467 Senior Thesis First semester of a two semester progression of senior thesis culminating in a well-crafted book-length creation of either poetry or prose. Prerequisite: 15 credits of creative writing, including ENG 459, ENG 461 or ENG 462, plus consent of faculty adviser.
468 Senior Thesis II Second semester of a two semester progression of senior thesis culminating in a well-crafted book-length creation of either poetry or prose. Prerequisite: 15 credits of creative writing, including ENG 459, ENG 461 or ENG 462, plus consent of faculty adviser.

472

Advanced Topics in African-American Literature

In-depth study of one or more authors or movements. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of English.

473

Advanced Technical Writing

Advanced study of the principles of document analysis, page design, collaborative writing environments, and editing skills in the production of documents typically created by technical writers and professionals in industry and government. Prerequisite 12 semester hours of English, or consent of instructor.

474 Technical and Professional Writing Internship

Supervised experience in technical and professional writing with an approved organization. A minimum of 140 hours of work for 3 credit hours. Prerequisites: junior standing, completion of 12 hours in the technical and professional writing minor, consent of instructor.

481

Advanced Composition

Advanced study of rhetoric, composition, and editing. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of English.

490

Senior Seminar

Advanced study of selected literary texts through the critical lens of literary theory with a regular rotation of seminars in World, American, and British literatures. For students completing teacher certification, ENG 444 serves as their seminar.
Prerequisite: twelve semester hours of English

495

Independent Study

Individual instruction, conference, research for advanced students. May be repeated up to six hours. Prerequisite 12 semester hours of English and consent of department.