Stephen F. Austin State University

Linguistics Courses

Spring 2016 Schedule

ENG 341 Introduction to Linguistics
MWF 9:00-9:50 a.m.
C. Sams
ENG 343 Linguistics of ASL
T 6:00-8:30 p.m.
J. Sams
ENG 344.001 Structures of English
MWF 12:00-12:50 p.m.
J. Sams
ENG 344.002 Structures of English TR 2:00-3:15 p.m.
J. Sams
ENG 442 Translation Studies MWF 10:00-10:50 a.m.
C. Sams
ENG 458 Forensic Semantics
TR 9:30-10:45 a.m.
C. Sams

Spring 2016 Special topics course descriptions

ENG 343 Linguistics of ASL T 6:00-8:30 p.m.

Linguistic study of ASL, including the following: phonological features of individual signs (hand shape, orientation, location, movement) and how those features shift when placed in a stream of signs; morphological features of signs, including compounding and lexicalization of fingerspelled words; grammar, focusing on typical word orders found in ASL sentences; meaning of signs and how those meanings have shifted over time (as well as how those meanings shift for particular dialects); and typical pragmatic features of conversation in ASL. Knowledge of ASL is helpful but not necessary (nor will it be assumed). No prerequisite.

ENG 442 Translation Studies MWF 10:00-10:50 a.m.

This course will focus on basic communication (speaker/author, audience, and message), formal and dynamic equivalence (how much a translation reflects the grammatical forms of the original language), semantic theory (theory of meaning), language and culture, pragmatics (how language is used), ethics and translation, and technology and translation. The aim of the course is application and evaluation of theory. Knowledge of another language is not necessary but will be helpful. We will look at both language in isolation as well as literary passages in translation. No prerequisite.

ENG 458 Forensic Semantics TR 9:30-10:45 a.m.

This course will focus on the analysis of the meaning of words, clauses, sentences, paragraphs, and discourse in legal, personal, and commercial communication (e.g., bribery cases, contracts, copyright infringement, courtroom discourse, depositions, plagiarism, policies, perjury, wills). No prior knowledge of Forensic Linguistics is assumed, nor is there a prerequisite.

Linguistics Courses

ENG 341. Introduction to Linguistics (offered every fall and spring)

*Used to be ENG 441.
Introduction to the core concepts of linguistic study, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics, and to the application of those concepts, such as language acquisition, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and language change. Analyses of linguistic concepts and applications focus on data from languages spoken around the world (i.e., will not focus on or be limited to English).
Prerequisites: None

ENG 342. History of the English Language (offered every fall)

Study of language change and reasons for change in the English language over the three major periods: Old, Middle, and Modern English. Types of linguistic changes include sound, structure, and meaning; investigation of possible causes for these changes focus on literary developments and socio-political factors that influenced the language. Within Modern English, examination of current English dialects around the world.

ENG 343. Descriptive Linguistics* (last offered Spring 2014)

Linguistic analysis of a language or language family. May be repeated up to three times under different languages.

Languages in focus include the following:

Proposed for Spring 2016
Spring 2014

ENG 344. Structures of English (offered every fall, spring, and Summer I)

Linguistic study of English, including phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. Includes an examination of several applied topics, focusing on topics such as English stylistics, language acquisition as it pertains to structures of English, English dialects, and history of English.

ENG 411. Teaching English as a Second Language* (last offered Spring 2013)

Survey of pedagogical, language learning and language development theories relevant to the teaching of English as a second language. Application of theories for particular language-learning groups. 30 hours of lecture and 15 hours of field-experience practicum.

ENG 437. Invented Languages* (offered every odd spring)

Examination of how language works and typical features of world languages in order to construct an invented language; also, examination of famous constructed languages (including Elvish, Na'vi, and Esperanto). Students will invent their own languages to better understand the challenges of constructing a language and linguistic principles at work in natural languages.

ENG 438. Forensic Linguistics (offered every fall)

Linguistic study of texts to determine authorship, evasion strategies, possible coercion, stylistic changes, deception, and so on. Linguistic tools include structural analysis and word choice. Texts analyzed include hate mail, suicide letters, ransom notes, confessions, manifestos, and text messages.

ENG 439. Advanced Grammar (offered every fall)

Advanced investigation of the concepts of grammatical form and function, including the application of labels such as noun, adjective, verb, subject, object, phrase, clause. Study will also include discussion of the use of grammar in written and spoken language, the teaching of grammar in classrooms, the debates about grammatical change in current language, and the notion of standard language.

ENG 440. Advanced Linguistics* (last offered Spring 2014 as Field Methods)

Advanced study of a combination of or all of the following areas of linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics; topics (i.e., area focus) will rotate. Linguistic areas may be examined through historical analysis, typological principles, and/or theoretical application. Students can take this course up to three times under different topics.

Prerequisite: ENG 341 or instructor approval

ENG 442. Topics in Linguistics* (last offered Spring 2015)

Advanced study of a topic within linguistics; topics will rotate. Example topics include sociolinguistics, language and culture, psycholinguistics, language and literature, corpus linguistics, and history of linguistic study. Students may repeat the course up to three times under different topics.

Past topics have included the following:

Spring 2015
Comparative Romance Linguistics
Spring 2014
Applied Linguistics in Media
Fall 2012
Conversation Analysis
Spring 2012
Language and Culture
Fall 2011
Second Language Acquisition
Fall 2010

ENG 458. Topics in Forensic Linguistics* (last offered Spring 2015 as Veracity and Language)

Advanced study of a topic within Forensic Linguistics; topics will rotate. Example topics include veracity and language, authorship analysis, and forensic semantics. Students may repeat the course up to three times under different topics.

*Denotes courses that are offered based on student interest and department need. If you are interested in a particular course/topic being offered, contact