Stephen F. Austin State University

Course Descriptions

Core Curriculum: Course Descriptions

A. Communication

English 6 Hours

ENG 131 Rhetoric and Composition
Study and application of the writing process and the skills of writing with a focus on analytical reading and writing. Essay assignments address rhetorical analysis and evaluation and critical responses to close readings of texts. Required of all students who do not qualify for English 133H or 235H. Prerequisite: Pass or exemption from THEA or a C in English 099. Must earn a grade of C or higher to be admitted to English 132.

ENG 132 Research and Argument
Continued study and application of the writing process and the skills of writing with a focus on the forms of argumentative writing and on research methods, such as gathering, evaluating, summarizing, synthesizing, and citing source information. Prerequisite: C in English 131. Must earn a C or higher to be admitted to any English 200 level course.

ENG 133H Composition and Rhetoric: Exposition and Argument
Intensive study and application of academic writing with a focus on analytical reading and writing. Essay assignments that address rhetorical analysis, argumentative writing, and the incorporation of research. Prerequisite: 28 or above on ACT or 580 or above on SAT. Not open to students with credit in English 131.

ENG 235H English for Selected Writers
Comprehensive course for specially selected students (required scores: 31 or higher ACT, 650 or higher SAT).

Communication Skills 6-8 Hours

BCM 247 Business Communication
Application of business communication principles through creation of effective business documents and oral presentations. Includes study and application of team communication and use of technology to facilitate the communication process.

COM 111 Public Speaking
Theory and practice in public speaking. Analysis of communication as a function of public speaking.

COM 170 Interpersonal Communication
Study of communication in the one-to-one situation leading to development of interpersonal communication skills. Emphasis on positive mental attitude and personal growth.

ENG 273 Technical & Scientific Writing (A)
The study of the rhetorical principles involved in technical and scientific workplace writing, with an emphasis on the production of professional documents, such as analytical reports.

FRE/SPA 131 & 132 Elementary French/Spanish
Introductory study of French/Spanish and their respective cultures with speaking, listening, reading and writing practice.

GRE/LAT 131 & 132 Elementary Greek/Latin
Introductory study of the language of ancient Greece/ classical Latin providing a firm grounding in grammar, syntax and vocabulary.

ILA 111 & 112 Elementary Language
Languages offered vary.

SPH 172 Beginning American Sign Language
Introduction to ASL and deaf culture. Includes principles, methods and techniques for communicating with deaf individuals who use ASL. Emphasis on the development of basic expressive and receptive skills for simple conversation with deaf individuals in ASL. Also includes brief history of signs.

SPH 272 American Sign Language II
Manual communication for the deaf using ASL. Emphasis placed on fluency and speed. Prerequisite: 80% or better on the SPH 172 comprehensive exam.

B. Mathematics 3-5 Hours

MTH 110 Math in Society
Provides an introduction to mathematical thinking emphasizing analysis of information for decision-making.

MTH 133 Plane Trigonometry (B)
Trigonometric functions of angles, radian measure, fundamental identities; addition, product, and half angle formulas, solution of triangles; polar coordinates; inverse trigonometric functions, complex numbers. May be required to have a graphics calculator.

MTH 138 College Algebra
Real numbers, relations and functions, inequalities, matrices, theory of equations, complex numbers, mathematical induction, sequences and series, binomial theorem, permutations and combinations. May be required to have a graphics calculator.

MTH 139 Plane Analytic Geometry
Beginning course in plane analytic geometry including the straight line, the circle, parabola, hyperbola, and the transformation of coordinates. May be required to have a graphics calculator. Prerequisites: MTH 133 and 138 or the equivalent.

MTH 140 Pre-calculus
5 semester hours. Preparatory for the calculus sequence: properties and graphs of algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric (with inverses); fundamental trigonometric identities, conic sections, polar and rectangular coordinate systems.

MTH 143 Finite Mathematics
Mathematical functions and graphs, linear systems of equations, matrices, linear programming, mathematics of finance; applications.

MTH 144 Elements of Calculus with Applications for Business
Limits and continuity, the derivative, the anti-derivative, the definite integral; applications. Prerequisite: MTH 143.

MTH 220 Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Probability, random variables, mean and variance, binomial distribution, normal distribution, statistical inference, and linear regression.

MTH 233 Calculus I
4 semester hours. Limits, continuity, differential calculus of algebraic and transcendental functions with applications, basic anti-differentiation with substitution, definite integrals. Prerequisite: MTH 139 or MTH 140.

MTH 234 Calculus II
4 semester hours. Applications and techniques of integration, improper integrals, infinite series and power series. Prerequisite: MTH 233.

C. Natural Sciences 6-8 Hours

Each course is 4 hours

AST 105 Classical and Modern Astronomy
Introductory study of planetary astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology. Computation of lecture and laboratory grades into one grade; same grade recorded for both lecture and laboratory.

BIO 121 Concepts of Biology
Concepts oriented course for the non-science major. Study of the origin of life, the cell, growth and reproduction, genetics, and evolution. May not be used to meet graduation requirements by students majoring in the College of Sciences and Mathematics or for certification of high school teachers in Biology.

BIO 123 Human Biology
Biological principles for non-science majors. Study of the evolution of man, organ systems, and the human organism. May not be used to meet graduation requirements of students majoring in the College of Sciences and Mathematics or for certification of high school teachers in Biology.

BIO 131 Principles of Botany (C)
Introduction to the fundamental principles of botany and the plant sciences. Topics include the study of plant form, function, reproduction, and an overview of plant diversity including bryophytes, ferns, and seed plants. BIO 133 Principles of Zoology - Fundamental principles of animal life, including invertebrate and vertebrate animals.

BIO 225 Local Flora (C)
Field and laboratory studies of common local ferns, conifers and wildflowers. Recommended for Biology and Non-biology majors. Required field trips. Required travel fee.

BIO 238 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (C)
Structure and function of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems, including sense organs. Not open to students who have received credit for BIO 327.

CHE 111 Introductory Chemistry I (D)
Introduction to the principles and concepts of chemical thought. Prerequisite: Eligibility for MTH 138.

CHE 112 Introductory Chemistry II
Elementary organic and biochemical systems. Prerequisites: CHE 111

CHE 133 General Chemistry I
Atomic and molecular structures, stoichiometry, gas laws, and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: MTH 138 or concurrent enrollment.

CHE 134 General Chemistry II
Equilibrium, kinetics, redox, descriptive chemistry and radiochemistry. Prerequisites: CHE 133, 133L, and MTH 138.

ENV 110 Introduction to Environmental Science
Introduction to the multidisciplinary study of the environment using the scientific method.

GOL 131 Introductory Geology
Designed for the student with no geology background. Introduction to the study of minerals, rocks and the processes that modify and shape the surface features of the Earth. Focus on energy, mineral and water resources; volcanism; and other practical aspects of geology.

GOL 132 The Earth Through Time
History and development of the continents and ocean basins, and the evolution of life on Earth. Includes earthquakes and the Earth's interior, mountain building, drifting continents and sea-floor spreading, the ice ages, space science, and oceanography. Prerequisite: GOL 131.

PHY 101 General Physics I
Presentation with a minimum of mathematics of the basic concepts of mechanics, light and sound. May not be used to meet graduation requirements by students majoring in the College of Sciences and Mathematics. Computation of lecture and laboratory grades into one grade; same grade recorded for both lecture and laboratory.

PHY 102 General Physics II
Continuation of PHY 101 presenting with a minimum of mathematics the basic concepts of heat, electricity, magnetism and certain aspects of modern physics. May not be used to meet graduation requirements by students majoring in the College of Sciences and Mathematics. Computation of lecture and laboratory grades into one grade; same grade recorded for both lecture and laboratory.

PHY 110 Fundamentals of Electronics
Introductory study of fundamental electrical circuits, including DC and AC circuits, filter networks, amplifiers, diodes, transistors, and logic gates.

PHY 118 Musical Acoustics
Waves, resonance, frequency, pitch, waveform, hearing, intervals, scales, strings, air columns, rods, plates, vocal apparatus, instruments. Computation of lecture and laboratory grades into one grade; same grade recorded for both lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: Ability to read music.

PHY 131 Mechanics and Heat
Fundamental principles of mechanics and heat. Computation of lecture and laboratory grades into one grade; same grade recorded for both lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: High school trigonometry.

PHY 241 Technical Physics I
Presentation of the principles of mechanics and heat. Computation of lecture and laboratory grades into one grade; same grade recorded for both lecture and laboratory. Co-requisite: MTH 233.

PHY 242 Technical Physics II
Presentation of the principles of sound, electricity, magnetism, and optics. Computation of lecture and laboratory grades into one grade; same grade recorded for both lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: MTH 233, PHY 241.

D. Humanities & Visual & Performing Arts

1. Visual & Performing Arts 3 Hours

ART 280 Art Appreciation
Western cultural history through the visual arts.

ART 281 Art History Survey I
Western Art from prehistory to 1400 A.D.

ART 282 Art History Survey II
Western Art from 1400 to 1900.

DAN 140 Dance Appreciation
Introduction to dance as a theatrical art and as a valued component in diversified cultures and societies.

DAN 341 History and Philosophy of Dance
Historical overview of dance from the period of early man with emphasis on the development of Western theatrical dance from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

MHL 245 Intro to Music Literature
Study of music literature and stylistic characteristics associated with the principal performance genres. Includes substantial listening activities, tools for studying music history-bibliographic and internet resources - and an introduction to world music

MUS 140 Music Appreciation
For non-music majors or minors only. Focusing on listening to music literature of the Western and American musical heritage.

THR 161 Theatre Appreciation
Study of theatre, performance, essential elements, difference between theatre and drama, and forms of drama.

THR 370 History of the Cinema
Study of the history of the motion pictures from their inception to the present including viewing and study of classic motion pictures.

2. Humanities (A) 3 Hours

ENG 200 Introduction to Literature (A)
Readings in literary genres, such as poetry, drama, short story, novel.

ENG 211 World Literature to 1650
Survey in the first half of Western and non-Western literatures spanning the periods from the first written literature through 1650.

ENG 212 World Literature from 1650
Survey in the second half of Western and non-Western literatures spanning the periods from 1650 to the present.

ENG 220 Readings in British Literature
Periods, genres, authors, themes in British literature. May include special topics.

ENG 221 British Literature to 1800
Survey of majors authors and literary movements/paradigms in British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the eighteenth century.

ENG 222 British Literature from 1800
Survey of major authors and literary movements/paradigms in British literature from Romanticism to the present, including study of the Victorians and Moderns.

ENG 229 American Literature to 1865
Survey of major authors and literary movements/paradigms in American literature from its beginnings to 1865.

ENG 230 American Literature from 1865
Survey of major authors and literary movements/paradigms in American literature from 1865 to the present.

ENG 300 Mythology
Study of Greek, Roman, and Hebraic mythology, emphasizing the role of myth in history, culture, and consciousness.

HIS 151 Western Civilization I
Political, social, economic and cultural history of the West from prehistoric times to the Reformation.

HIS 152 Western Civilization II
Political, social, economic and cultural history of the West from the Reformation to the 20th century.

PHI 153 Introduction to Philosophy
In addition to a concern with the goals, nature and methods of Philosophy, focus on issues concerning philosophical theories of knowledge and reality, drawing on ideas from a variety of disciplines. Possible topics: the nature of philosophy, the problem of skepticism and knowledge, mind and personal identity, and the nature and existence of God. Emphasis on the nature of philosophy and its relation to education, logic and critical thinking.

PHI 223 Introduction to Ethics
Focus on moral theories and issues, drawing on ideas from a variety of disciplines. Emphasis on moral reasoning and moral theories.

E. Social & Behavioral Sciences

1. History 6 Hours

HIS 133 U.S. History Survey, 1000-1877
Comprehensive survey of American history from early explorations through Reconstruction.

HIS 134 U.S. History Survey, 1877-Present
Comprehensive survey of American history from the end of Reconstruction to the present.

2. Political Science 6 Hours

PSC 141 Introduction to American Government: Theory and Politics
Origins and development of American and Texas government systems; federalism; civil liberties and civil rights; interest groups, political parties, and elections.

PSC 142 Introduction to American Government: Structure and Functions
Legislative, executive and judicial functions in American and Texas governments; public policy areas such as finance, social services, and foreign policy; Texas local and county governments.

3. Social/Behavioral Science 3 Hours

ANT 231 Cultural Anthropology
Introduction to the study of culture and its function in societies.

ECO 231 Principles of Macroeconomics
Introduction to the behavioral science of economics which focuses on the aggregate behavior of households, firms and the government.

ECO 232 Principles of Microeconomics
Introduction to the behavioral science of economics which focuses on the behavior of individual consumers, firms, government agencies and resource owners.

GEO 131 World Regional Geography
Broad investigation of the world's culture regions. Basic cultural, demographic, economic, political, and physical patterns, with current events highlighted.

GEO 230 Cultural Geography
Study of how culturally diverse societies adapted to, and modified, the earth's surface: creating "cultural landscapes" which contrast with pristine "natural landscapes."

PSY 133 General Psychology
Survey of fundamental principles of behavior, including physiological, perceptual, developmental, learning, motivational, cognitive, social, historical, and methodological perspectives.

PSY 153 Human Sexuality
The psychology of sexual behavior as related to social conduct.

SOC 137 Introduction to Sociology
General examination of culture, socialization, roles, values, social inequalities, population, social institutions, and social change.

SOC 139 Minority Relations
How minorities are created, their objectives, current status, the development of racism and how discrimination and prejudice may be diminished.


SFA 101 Freshman Seminar
An overview of University resources, the history and traditions of SFA, university rules and procedures, the value of a college education, critical thinking skills, using the university library and knowing how to access information, time management and study skills, career planning, and choosing the right major for you. There is one section of SFA 101 dedicated specifically for students who are Undeclared majors.

Notes:

(A) BCM 247 and all English courses level 200 and up have the pre-requisite of ENG 132.

(B) Math Courses Level 133 and up are subject to placement guidelines set by the Math Department.

(C) Biology courses for science majors have the pre-requisite of being TSI complete in all areas.

(D) Chemistry courses have the pre-requisites of being TSI complete in all areas and eligible for MTH 138 or higher.