Stephen F. Austin State University

Keynote Speakers

Asia Conference - Keynote Speakers

Diplomats

Harsh Bhasin
Harsh Bhasin

The current Chair of the Department of Asian & Asian-American Studies, Ambassador Harsh Bhasin has been a Visiting Professor of International Relations at Stony Brook University since 2001. Before joining Stony Brook, he served as a career diplomat for nearly four decades with overseas assignments that included China, Malaysia, the US, Hong Kong, Nepal, Botswana, South Africa and Denmark. Of these, he served as India's Ambassador to the last three named countries.

During his Foreign Service career, Ambassador Bhasin served twice in the United States - first in Washington DC in the late 70s and early 80s, and later as Consul General of India in New York in the mid 90s. During the 1990-91 academic year he was a senior fellow at the Center for International Affairs at Harvard University where he researched the political dynamics of the reform process then underway in South Africa, that culminated in the dismantling of apartheid and the emergence of a multiracial South Africa. He was an official observer at South Africa's first ever non-racial elections that were held in 1994 and which returned Nelson Mandela to power.

Ambassador Bhasin is also a graduate of the National Defence College of India, New Delhi (1986) where his interests centered around the evolving relations between India and China. At the State University of New York at Stony Brook, (now) Professor Bhasin has taught highly-popular courses on the Politics and Diplomacy of Contemporary India and of Contemporary China, as well as on India's Foreign Policy and on the Practice of Diplomacy. His current research interests are focused on the emerging relationship between the United States, India and China in the twenty-first century. A book on the subject, titled The Big Three: The Emerging Relationship Between the United States, India and China in the Changing World Order was released in September 2009.

Michael Armacost
Michael Armacost

Michael Armacost has been at the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (Shorenstein APARC) since 2002. In the interval between 1995 and 2002, Armacost served as president of Washington, D.C.'s Brookings Institution, the nation's oldest think tank and a leader in research on politics, government, international affairs, economics, and public policy. Previously, during his twenty-four year government career, Armacost served, among other positions, as undersecretary of state for political affairs and as ambassador to Japan and the Philippines.

Dr. Armacost began his career in academia, as a professor of government at Pomona College. In 1969, he was awarded a White House Fellowship, and was assigned to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary of State. Following a stint on the State Department's policy planning and coordination staff, he became a special assistant to the U.S. ambassador in Tokyo from 1972 to 74, his first foreign diplomatic post. Thereafter, he held senior Asian affairs and international security posts in the State Department, the Defense Department, and the National Security Council. From 1982 to 1984, he served as U.S. ambassador to the Philippines, and was a key force in helping the country undergo a nonviolent transition to democracy. In 1989, President George Bush tapped him to become ambassador to Japan, considered one of the most important and sensitive U.S. diplomatic posts abroad.

Dr. Armacost is the author of three books, the most recent of which, Friends or Rivals?, was published in 1996 and draws on his tenure as ambassador. He also co-edited, with Daniel Okimoto, the Future of America's Alliances in Northeast Asia, published in 2004 by Shorenstein APARC. Armacost has served on numerous corporate and nonprofit boards, including TRW, AFLAC, Applied Materials, USEC, Inc., Cargill, Inc., and Carleton College, and he recently chaired the board of The Asia Foundation.

Adrian Beresford Taylor
Adrian Beresford Taylor

Adrian Beresford Taylor is currently CEO of 4Sing: Foresight and Strategy for Security and Sustainability in Governance. In the course of his work, he has had occasion to work in over 33 countries of the world, and runs workshops in English, French and German. His previous positions include scenario planner in a joint venture with Global Business Network, Desk Officer for India at the European Commission, visiting scholar at Georgia Tech, Director of Strategy at the European School of Governance in Berlin, and Director of Public Sector Strategies for Think Tools GmbH. His education includes 1st Class Honours Degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics from Trinity College Oxford University, and a Licence Spéciale (Maters) in European Studies with "Grande Distinction" from the Université Libre de Bruxelles. Mr. Taylor regularly contributes editorial pieces to journals and won 1st prize in the BP/European University Institute Essay Contest for "Resolving and Preventing US-EU Trade Disputes." Mr. Taylor has lived in London, Gibraltar, Oxford, Brussels, Atlanta, Zurich, New York, Munich, and currently resides in Hamburg.

Panelists

Socio-Political

Joseph Harris
Joseph Harris
Joseph Harris is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Boston University. I hold a doctorate in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a Master's in Public Affairs from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and am a past recipient of the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship and the Henry Luce Scholarship. His research explores the role of public health experts and AIDS activists in efforts to institutionalize universal healthcare in Thailand, Brazil, and South Africa.
Ellen Boccuzzi
Ellen Boccuzzi

Ellen Boccuzzi is Senior Program Officer for Governance and Law with The Asia Foundation. She has fifteen years of professional experience in international development, good governance, and civil society issues with a focus on Asia.

Prior to joining the Asia Foundation, Dr. Boccuzzi served as a Foreign Service Officer with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), where she managed USAID's media development portfolio in Afghanistan and contributed to USAID strategies on human trafficking and Democracy, Human Rights, and Governance (DRG).

Dr. Boccuzzi has worked as a consultant to the International Labour Organization (ILO) and UNESCO on migration and education issues across Asia. She has also served as a researcher with the Asian Research Center for Migration (ARCM) and as lead Bangkok researcher for a multi-country project on squatter resettlement. Dr. Boccuzzi's academic and policy work focus on migration and urbanization in Asia, and she has held teaching appointments at the University of California, Berkeley and Thammasat University in Thailand. She is the author of Bangkok Bound, a study of Thai rural-urban migration based on an examination of first-hand writings by migrants.

Dlynn Armstrong-Williams
Dlynn Armstrong-Williams

Dlynn Armstong-Williams is Associate Professor and chair of the Department of Political Science and International Affairs at the university of North Georgia. Her teaching areas include East Asian politics, comparative foreign policy and international relations theory. Dr. Armstrong-Williams publications focus on South Korea and its status as a middle power. She serves on the University System Georgia's Council on International Education was previously Director of the Center for Global at the University of North Georgia.

Panelists

Security

Robert M. Hathaway
Robert M. Hathaway
Robert M. Hathaway has been director of the Asia Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C., since 1999. Prior to joining the Wilson Center, he served for twelve years on the professional staff of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives, where he specialized in U.S. foreign policy toward Asia. Dr. Hathaway has also been a member of the History Staff of the Central Intelligence Agency, and has taught at George Washington University and at Barnard, Middlebury, and Wilson Colleges. He holds a Ph.D. in American Diplomatic History from the University of North Carolina. Hathaway's most recent book is New Security Challenges in Asia (Wilson Center Press and Johns Hopkins Unviersity Press, 2013), co-edited with Michael Wills. Two other co-edited books focus on Pakistan: Empty Bellies, Broken Dreams: Food Insecurity and the Future of Pakistan (Vanguard Books, 2011) and Powering Pakistan: Meeting Pakistan's Energy Needs in the 21st Century (Oxford University Press, 2009). He has authored three other books as well as numerous articles on post-1933 U.S. foreign policy.
Carrie Liu Currier
Carrie Liu Currier

Carrie Liu Currier (M.A., Ph.D. University of Arizona; B.A. University of Michigan) teaches courses in Asian politics, comparative politics, feminist international relations theory, international relations, and global political economy. Her research has generally focused on: 1) economic reform in China, to understand how developing countries are adapting to the demands of globalization, 2) China's Foreign Policy with the Middle East, examining both arms transfers and the pursuit of energy, 3) China's energy policy and pursuit of resources, 4) China's one child policy and its social implications, and 5) the politics of entrepreneurship in Taiwan and China. She has conducted survey research in both China and Taiwan, examining labor market reforms and its impact on women's public and private sphere activities as well as analyzing the role the state has played in fostering entrepreneurship. Her current research is based on fieldwork she recently completed in Taiwan, examining the regulations and opportunities for entrepreneurship as well as a more in-depth examination of Taiwan's start-up industry. Her publications include: a co-edited book (with Manochehr Dorraj) China's Energy Relations with the Developing World, several book chapters, and several articles in the following journals: American Journal of Chinese Studies, Asian Journal of Women's Studies, China Public Affairs Quarterly, Journal of Chinese Political Science, Journal of Women Politics and Policy, and Middle East Policy.

In addition, she is the director of TCU's Asian Studies program, serves on the Women's Studies Advisory committee, and formally advises several student groups on campus. Within the profession she has served on the board of the Southwest Asian Studies Association, she is the incoming Secretary of the Western Political Science Association (WPSA) and she has served on several committees within the Feminist Theory Gender Studies section of ISA (International Studies Association).

Charles Kennedy
Charles Kennedy

Professor Kennedy has written about South Asian political and governmental systems since 1975 and has conducted extensive field research in Pakistan, Bangladesh, and India. He served as the Director of the American Institute of Pakistan Studies from 1988-2001; and was the institute's Secretary from 1982-1988. He has written or edited numerous books and other scholarly publications, which deal with South Asia. His most recent include: Government and Politics in South Asia (Westview Press, 2009), Pakistan: 2005 (Oxford University Press, 2006), and Pakistan at the Millennium (Oxford University Press, 2003).

Professor Kennedy also has a long-standing teaching and professional interest in the issues of political Islam, and in US foreign policy with respect to the Middle East and South Asia especially pertaining to Pakistan, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, and Iraq. His current research interests focus on: military regimes and constitutionalism in Pakistan and Bangladesh and Pakistani domestic politics. He has served as the Coordinator of WFU's Middle East and South Asia Interdisciplinary Program since its founding in 2005.

Panelists

Economic

Hiroki Takeuchi
Hiroki Takeuchi
Hiroki Takeuchi received his B.A. of Economics from Keio University in Japan, his M.A. of Asian Studies from University of California at Berkeley, and his Ph.D. of Political Science from University of California at Los Angeles. He is currently an assistant professor of political science at Southern Methodist University. Previously, he taught at UCLA as a faculty fellow of the Political Science Department and at Stanford University as a postdoctoral teaching fellow of the Public Policy Program. Professor Takeuchi's research and teaching interests include Chinese and Japanese politics, comparative political economy of authoritarian regimes, and international relations of East Asia, as well as applying game theory to political science.
Hoon Lee
Hoon Lee
Hoon Lee is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Texas Tech University. Dr. Lee received his Ph.D. from the University of Iowa in 2008 and joined the Texas Tech faculty in 2008. His research interest focuses on international political economy, especially about foreign investment and the politics of globalization. His work has appeared in journals such as International Studies Quarterly, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Legislative Studies Quarterly, Foreign Policy Analysis, International Interactions, and International Area Studies Review. He teaches graduate courses on International Political Economy and Time Series Analysis.
Troy Stangarone
Troy Stangarone

Troy Stangarone joined the Korea Economic Institute (KEI) in December of 2005 and is the Senior Director of Congressional Affairs and Trade. He oversees KEI's trade and economic related initiatives, as well as the Institute's relations with Capitol Hill and the Washington, DC trade community. As part of his broader portfolio he serves as the editor for KEI's flagship publication, Korea's Economy, and oversees KEI's new blog, The Peninsula. He is also a 2012-2013 Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow in South Korea, sponsored by the Asan Institute for Policy Studies.

Mr. Stangarone has written extensively and has been widely quoted on U.S.-Korea relations, South Korean trade and foreign policy, and North Korea. His work has appeared in publications such as the Seattle Times, the Memphis Commercial Appeal, the International Journal of Korean Unification Studies, Global Asia, the Council on Foreign Relations Asia Unbound blog, the LSE Ideas blog, the Georgetown Journal of International Affairs blog, The Diplomat, China-US Focus, the JoongAng Ilbo, the Korea Herald, and Korea Policy Review. His comments have appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg News, Politico, Reuters, UPI, CQ Today, Chosun Ilbo, Donga Ilbo, JoongAng Daily, and Yonhap News Service. He has also appeared on CNBC Asia, BBC Radio, Sky News Arabia, KBS News, and The Morning Show and The Evening Show on eTBS radio.

Prior to joining KEI, Mr. Stangarone worked on Capitol Hill for Senator Robert Torricelli on issues relating to foreign affairs and trade. He also served as an aide to Governor James McGreevey of New Jersey. He holds a MSc. in International Relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science and a B.A. in Political Science and Economics from the University of Memphis.