Stephen F. Austin State University

Tobacco and Vape Free Campus

Tobacco and Vape Free Campus Policy

As of August 22, 2016, Stephen F. Austin State University is a tobacco and vape free campus. This policy includes all property that is owned, leased, occupied, or controlled by the University.

The policy is based upon the recommendation of the Employee Wellness Advisory Board comprised of faculty, staff and students.

The tobacco and vape free campus policy is part of the University's commitment to creating a healthy and sustainable environment for all members of the SFA community, and is designed to be positive and health-directed. The University is not requiring faculty, staff, and students to quit using tobacco products, but does expect the policy to be adhered to by all individuals on University property.

Enforcement of the policy will be achieved primarily through education, awareness and a spirit of cooperation. Tobacco users are expected to adhere to the policy and be respectful to ex-tobacco users and non-tobacco users. Individuals noticing violations of the policy should strive to be non-confrontational and respectful to tobacco users when communicating this policy.

About SFA's Tobacco and Vape Free Policy

Policy Statement

Effective August 22, 2016, Stephen F. Austin State University is a tobacco and vape free campus. The use of all tobacco and vape products (including but not limited to cigarettes, cigars, pipes, smokeless tobacco, e-cigarettes, vaporizers, vape pens, hookahs, blunts, pipes, snuff, and any other tobacco or vape related product) is prohibited on all property that is owned, leased, occupied, or controlled by Stephen F. Austin State University. Additionally, the sale or free sampling of tobacco or vape products is prohibited on university property. This policy applies to all employees, students, university affiliates, contractors, and visitors.

The university shall offer and promote tobacco prevention and education programming on campus as well as provide applicable resources to help individuals who want to quit using tobacco products.

Rationale

History

Tobacco Cessation Resources

Stephen F. Austin State University is committed to supporting students, faculty and staff who want to quit smoking.

For students

Students who desire to quit can consult a medical practitioner at the SFASU Health Clinic. Smoking cessation strategies will be provided. Make an appointment by calling 936-468-4008.

Individual counseling with Licensed Professional Counselors is available for students. Call Counseling Services at 936-468-2401 or come by the 3rd floor of the Rusk Building to make an appointment.

For faculty and staff

United Healthcare offers smoking cessation services to SFASU employees. Tobacco cessation coaching is a benefit provided by HealthSelect. This free, confidential service consists of telephone coaching by training professionals. This program is tailored to your individual smoking habits and needs. To enroll in the telephone coaching program, call HealthSelect customer service at 1-866-336-9371. HealthSelect members can also visit www.uhc.com and select the Health and Wellness tab for more information.

Prescription Nicotine Replacement Therapy is a covered benefit for HealthSelect members. Contact your pharmacy benefit manger Caremark (1-888-886-8490) or visit http://www.ers.state.tx.us/Employees/Health/Prescription_Drugs/ for more information on medications that are covered under your benefits.

For Students / Faculty / Staff

  1. Quit Kits - SFA offers this resource which includes educational materials and tools to help you quit. Visit one of the following locations to pick up your Quit Kit. All pickups will remain confidential.
    1. Human Resources (Austin Building 2nd Floor)
    2. Counseling Services (Rusk Building 3rd Floor)
    3. Health Clinic (Corner of Raguet and East College)
    4. Student Recreation Center (Administration Office)
  2. SFA Counseling Services - Counseling Services offers free weekly workshops for the campus community on topics related to stress management and wellness. Call 936-468-2401 for more information.
  3. 1-877-44U-QUIT (1-877-448-7848) - The National Cancer Institute's trained counselors are available to provide information and help with quitting in English or Spanish, Monday through Friday, 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.
  4. 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669) - The National Telephonic Quitline will connect callers directly to their state quitline. All state quitlines have in place trained coaches who provide information and help with quitting.
  5. American Lung Association Freedom from Smoking Online Program - The American Lung Association offers an evidenced based on-line program consisting of eight self-paced modules, each containing four lessons, and an interactive message board to assist you in quitting tobacco. http://www.ffsonline.org/
  6. Quit Now TEXAS: Online Tobacco Sensation - Tobacco Cessation is about more than just not smoking. This program uses "The 4 Essential Practices to Quit For Life," that are based on 25 years of research and experience helping people quit tobacco. www.quitnow.net/texas/
  7. Become an Ex - The EX plan teaches individuals how to live life without cigarettes in three steps. This free program was developed at the highly respected Mayo Clinic and is endorsed by the National Alliance for Tobacco Cessation. https://www.becomeanex.org/
  8. Tobacco Quitline - The Quitline offers personalized support and the tools and strategies to become smoke- and tobacco-free. Services include confidential phone and web counseling services and resources such as nicotine patches, gums, or lozenges, for those that qualify. 1-877-YES QUIT (1-877-937-7848) and http://www.yesquit.org/
  9. SmokeFreeTXT - This free mobile text messaging service is designed for adults and young adults who are trying to quit smoking. The program was created to provide 24/7 encouragement, advice, and tips to help smokers quit smoking and stay quit. Smokefree.gov/SmokeFreeTXT
  10. BeTobaccoFree.gov - This comprehensive website providing one-stop access to the best and most up-to-date tobacco-related information from across its agencies. This consolidated resource includes general information on tobacco, federal and state laws and policies, health statistics, and evidence-based methods on how to quit. betobaccofree.hhs.gov/

Tobacco and Vape Free Policy FAQs

What does the Tobacco and Vape Free Campus Policy Prohibit?
The Tobacco and Vape Free Campus Policy prohibits the use, sale or free sampling of tobacco or vape products on all university property.
When does the policy become effective?
August 22, 2016. The policy is applicable 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
What is considered university property in this policy?
Property that is owned, leased, occupied, or controlled by Stephen F. Austin State University. This includes but is not limited to all buildings, structures, vehicles, sidewalks, parking lots, walkways and attached parking structures owned or controlled by the university.
To whom does the policy apply?
This policy applies to all employees, students, university affiliates, contractors, and visitors.
What tobacco products are included in the policy?
All tobacco and vape products (including but not limited to cigarettes, cigars, pipes, smokeless tobacco, e-cigarettes, vaporizers, vape pens, hookahs, blunts, pipes, snuff, and any other tobacco or vape related product.
What is the reason to implement the policy at SFASU?
To reduce health risks for SFASU students, faculty, staff and visitors while respecting the rights of individuals and to ensure SFASU compliance with a new state rule that requires certification of a tobacco-free workplace for entities receiving funds from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT).
Is anyone required to quit smoking?
SFASU is not requiring anyone to quit using tobacco products, but SFASU does expect all individuals on university property to adhere to the policy.
How will this policy be enforced?
All members of the university community are responsible for adherence to the tobacco-free campus policy. University community members are empowered to respectfully inform others about the policy.
How will people be notified of the policy?
Current and prospective students and employees will be notified through communication services available on university web sites, including the mySFA website. Notification of this policy also will be made during admission and enrollment processes for students and/or during New Employee Orientation for faculty and staff.
How will be people attending events on the SFASU campus be notified?
Public event organizers on campus are responsible for communicating the policy to attendees. Organizers and attendees at university public events (such as conferences, meetings, public lectures, social events, cultural events and sporting events) are required to follow the Tobacco and Vape Free Policy.
Have other universities implemented a tobacco-free, smoke-free campus?

Yes, some as early as 2003, and the number continues to increase. There are over 600 college and university campuses all across the United States that have enacted 100% tobacco or smoke free campuses.

Visit the following links to view other universities who have a tobacco-free, smoke-free policy.

Who should I contact if I have questions concerning policy implementation?

Faculty and Staff: Please contact the Office of Human Resources by phone at 936-468-2304.

Students: Please contact the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities by phone at 936-468-2703.

Who should I contact if I have questions concerning tobacco cessation resources?

Faculty and Staff: Please contact Human Resources by phone at 936-468-2304 for resources associated with benefits, and the Employee Wellness Program by phone at 936-468-6056 for all other resources.

Students: Please contact the Health Clinic by phone at 936-468-4008.

References

1 National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention, & Health Promotion (US) Office on Smoking and Health. (2014). The health consequences of smoking-50 years of progress: A report of the surgeon general. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK179276/

2 National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, & Office of Smoking and Health. (2010). Tobacco use: September 2010, CDC vital signs. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/tobaccouse/smoking/

3 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (US), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (US), & Office on Smoking and Health (US). (2010). How tobacco smoke causes disease: The biology and behavioral basis for smoking-attributable disease: A report of the surgeon general. Retrieved from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK53017/

4 An, L. C., Berg, C. J., Klatt, C. M., Perry, C. L., Thomas, J. L., Luo, X., Ehlinger, E., & Ahluwalia, J. S. (2009). Symptoms of cough and shortness of breath among occasional young adult smokers. Nicotine Tobacco Research, 11(2), 126-133. doi:10.1093/ntr/ntp015­­­

5 Schane, R. E., Ling, P. M., & Glantz, S. A. (2010). Health effects of light and intermittent smoking: a review. Circulation, 121, 1518-1522. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.109.904235

6 Bjartveit, K., & Tverdal, A. (2005). Health consequences of smoking 1-4 cigarettes per day. Tobacco Control, 14, 315-320. doi:10.1136/tc.2005.011932

7 Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. (2010). Health harms from secondhand smoke. Retrieved from https://www.srhd.org/documents/smoke-free-housing/SHS-fact-sheet.pdf

8 National Toxicology Program, & Public Health Service, HHS. (2014). Report on carcinogens. Retrieved from http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/roc/content/profiles/tobaccorelatedexposures.pdf

9 Center for Health Statistics. (2011). Texas Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Survey Data. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/annual_data/annual_data.htm

10 Seo, D. C., Macy, J. T., Torabi, M. R., & Middlestadt, S. E. (2011). The effect of a smoke-free campus policy on college students' smoking behaviors and attitudes. Preventative Medicine, 53(4-5), 347-352. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.07.015